Category Archives: Education

Call-for-Papers: “A Workshop on Vulnerability and Education”

Call-for-Papers: “A Workshop on Vulnerability and Education,” Amherst College, Amherst, MA, Apr. 24-25, 2015 with a call deadline of Jan. 19, 2015.

New Report (from the White House): “2014 Native Youth Report”

DSC_0351New Report (from the White House): “2014 Native Youth Report” (2014).  [Largely about socioeconomic issues and educational problems.]

Decades of Neglect Show Starkly as Indian Schools Cry Out for Repairs – NYTimes.com

Decades of Neglect Show Starkly as Indian Schools Cry Out for Repairs – NYTimes.com.

The American Dream Is Leaving America – NYTimes.com

The American Dream Is Leaving America – NYTimes.com. [Op-Ed by Kristof on education and economic mobility.]

No, college isn’t the answer. Reparations are. – The Washington Post

No, college isn’t the answer. Reparations are. – The Washington Post.

Op-Ed: Why Poor Students Struggle – NYTimes.com

Why Poor Students Struggle – NYTimes.com.

New Article: “Tracing the School-to-Prison Pipeline from Zero-Tolerance Policies to Juvenile Justice Dispositions”

New Article: Aaron J. Curtis, Tracing the School-to-Prison Pipeline from Zero-Tolerance Policies to Juvenile Justice Dispositions, 102 Geo. L.J. 1251 (2014).  Abstract below:

In recent years, schools have attempted to combat school violence and other behavioral problems by instituting harsh disciplinary policies and referring students to law enforcement. Civil rights advocates argue that these practices push students, especially students of color, “out of school and into the juvenile and criminal justice systems.” The process has come to be known as the school-to-prison pipeline.

Throughout the literature discussing this phenomenon, authors often reference juvenile justice systems in passing, but few studies have given in-depth attention to the specific practices within juvenile courts that perpetuate the school-to-prison pipeline. Accordingly, this Note takes a closer look at the connection between harsh disciplinary practices in schools and the dispositional processes that occur in juvenile justice systems. Part I examines zero-tolerance policies that push students out of schools in the first place. Part II explores the ways that students then enter juvenile courts. Part III discusses the guidelines and other factors that shape judges’ dispositional decisions, particularly when they handle minor crimes and violations of zero-tolerance policies. Finally, Part IV describes alternatives to punitive sanctions for juvenile offenders. Overall, this Note concludes that zero-tolerance policies and punitive juvenile justice dispositions fail to remedy the problems that they are meant to resolve.

Op-Ed: “Help Families From Day 1″

Father Son Portrait.  Copyright 2014.

Father Son Portrait. Copyright 2014.

Op-Ed: Clare Huntington, Help Families From Day 1, N.Y. Times, Sep. 2, 2014.  

Good op-ed and this photo is only being used because I could not find my photo of Stapleton!

Generation Later, Poor Are Still Rare at Elite Colleges – NYTimes.com

Generation Later, Poor Are Still Rare at Elite Colleges – NYTimes.com.

Op-Ed on Elite Education and Class: “Why I’m Skipping My Harvard Reunion (A Call to Action)”

_DSC0108Why I’m Skipping My Harvard Reunion (A Call to Action) | Evan Mandery.

And here is a story from the Yale Alumni Magazine that is on the topic of admitting poorer (or just not rich) students.  My own perspective is that there are plenty of poor students who can “handle” Yale or Harvard, the problem is what is defined as merit in the admissions process.  “We can’t find them” or “we can’t get them to apply” are not good justifications for continually favoring the children of the elite.  (Many of you have seen it, but here is my parody article that touches in part on going to such schools.)