Category Archives: housing

Program shields landlords willing to rent to the homeless | Local News | The Seattle Times

Program shields landlords willing to rent to the homeless | Local News | The Seattle Times.

News Article: Domestic Violence Drives Up New York Shelter Population as Housing Options Are Scarce – NYTimes.com

Domestic Violence Drives Up New York Shelter Population as Housing Options Are Scarce – NYTimes.com.

New-ish Article: “Addressing the Foreclosure Crisis Through Law School Clinics”

New Article: Nathalie Martin & Max Weinstein, Addressing the Foreclosure Crisis Through Law School Clinics, 20 Geo. J. Poverty Law & Pol’y 531 (2013).  Abstract below:

Since the 2008 financial crisis, unprecedented numbers of homes have been lost to foreclosure in the United States, all while public funds for free or reduced fee legal representation in some communities have all but disappeared. This means that most homeowners in foreclosure are unable to find lawyers to represent them. At the same time, clinical legal education, especially in subjects related to business and commercial law, is on the rise. This convergence offers a unique opportunity for law school clinics to give students valuable training in both litigation and financial law and also help fill the deep need for legal representation by homeowners in foreclosure. Each of us has experience representing homeowners in foreclosure, Max at Harvard Law School in the Predatory Lending and Consumer Protection Clinic, and Nathalie in the University of New Mexico School of Law’s Business and Tax Clinic.

In this Article, we discuss our experiences and offer advice and insights for clinics considering taking cases of this kind. Part I provides a very brief overview of the conditions that led to the financial crisis, a description of the extent of the problem, and a few ways clinical law programs can help. Part II discusses the practical and philosophical reasons why law school clinics play such a pivotal role in stemming the effects of the crisis on homeowners, through examples of cases litigated in Max’s clinic. Part Ill attempts to give readers a few of the basic tools they need to add this practice to their clinics for the benefit of individual homeowners and their communities.

New Article: “The New Exclusionary Zoning”

New Article: John Mangin, The New Exclusionary Zoning, 25 Stan.L.& Pol’y Rev. 91 (2014).  Abstract below:

If low-income families can’t afford the suburbs and the cities, where should they go? For the first time in American history, it makes sense to talk about whole regions of the country “gentrifying”—whole metropolitan areas whose high housing costs have rendered them inhospitable to low-income families, who, along with solidly middle class families, also feeling the crunch, have been paying higher housing costs or migrating to low-housing cost (and low-wage) areas like Texas, Arizona, or North Carolina. Underlying both of these phenomena—high housing costs in the suburbs and high housing costs in the cities—is a relatively straightforward problem of supply and demand. A city’s ability to remain affordable depends most crucially on its ability to expand housing supply in the face of increased demand. Among the people who care most about high housing costs there is a lack of understanding of the main causes and the policy approaches that can address them. The central message of this Article is that the housing advocacy community—from the shoe-leather organizer to the academic theoretician—needs to abandon its reflexively anti-development sentiments and embrace an agenda that accepts and advocates for increased housing development of all types as a way to blunt rising housing costs in the country’s most expensive markets.

New Article: “Housing Changing Households: Regulatory Challenges for Micro-Units and Accessory Dwelling Units”

New Article: John Infranca, Housing Changing Households: Regulatory Challenges for Micro-Units and Accessory Dwelling Units, 25 Stan.L.& Pol’y Rev. 53 (2014).  Abstract below:

Available housing units frequently fail to match the needs of a city’s evolving household forms. In response to unmet demand and illegal units, some jurisdictions have altered regulations to permit the development of different types of housing, including both accessory dwelling units (ADUs) and micro-units. Developers in a variety of jurisdictions, however, have shown interest in both unit types. This Article provides the first comprehensive study of regulatory challenges to both ADUs and micro-units in a geographically diverse range of jurisdictions, focusing on micro-unit and ADU development in New York, Washington, D.C., Austin, Denver, and Seattle. The Article discusses how changing household composition is resulting in a mismatch between housing needs and existing housing supply, and it reviews the claimed benefits and potential criticisms of micro-units and ADUs. Finally, the Article evaluates whether demand for these units is a passing fad or signals a more substantial shift in housing and planning patterns.

News Article: “Give the Homeless Homes”

News Article: James Surowiecki, Give the Homeless Homes, The New Yorker, Sept. 22, 2014

Call-for-Papers: “2015 Policy Summit on Housing, Human Capital & Inequality”

Call For Papers
2015 Policy Summit on Housing, Human Capital & Inequality

June 18-19, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

The Federal Reserve Banks of Cleveland, Philadelphia, and Richmond invite paper submissions for the 2015 Policy Summit on Housing, Human Capital, and Inequality, which will be held June 18-19 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The conference brings together researchers and practitioners interested in economic policy and development in low- and moderate-income communities.

OVERVIEW: As the nation continues its recovery from the Great Recession, it is important to understand how economic growth can more equitably benefit low- and moderate income individuals. With this in mind, and having selected a theme of economic growth and opportunity for the 2015 Policy Summit, we encourage the submission of high-quality research papers in the following areas: economic development, entrepreneurship, equitable development, recent trends in CRA lending (i.e., access to capital and credit for small businesses), workforce development, education reform, and related topics. In particular, we encourage the submission of research and work that is applicable to the Federal Reserve’s Third, Fourth, and Fifth Districts – comprising all of Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, North and South Carolina, Washington, D.C., and parts of New Jersey and Kentucky.

The Policy Summit is a now-biennial forum that attracts an audience of several hundred academics, bankers, elected officials, funders, policymakers, and practitioners from across the eastern United States. If your paper is selected, you will be asked to present at the Policy Summit, which will be held June 18-19, 2015, at the Omni William Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Travel and accommodation expenses per Federal Reserve guidelines will be covered for presenters.

PAPER SUBMISSION PROCEDURE: The deadline for submissions is 5:00 PM, Friday, December 19, 2014. Please submit an extended abstract or a draft of your research paper by this date to http://frb.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_dcZ52H3FFB3YdaR. We will notify submitting authors of accepted papers by January 31, 2015; full conference papers will be due June 4, 2015.

FURTHER INFORMATION: Please direct any questions about the call for papers to Dionissi Aliprantis at dionissi.aliprantis@clev.frb.org, Lisa Nelson at lisa.a.nelson@clev.frb.org, or Shannon McKay at shannon.mckay@rich.frb.org

New Report: “State of the Nation’s Housing 2014″

son_2014_coverNew Report: Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, State of the Nation’s Housing 2014 (2014).  [Note: the link takes you to the main page and from there you can open the whole report or individual sections.]

Symposium Issues published (in 2013): “Saving the Cities: How to Make America’s Urban Core Sustainable in the Twenty-First Century”

Symposium Issues published (in 2013): St. Louis U. Pub. L. Rev. published a symposium issue on “Saving the Cities: How to Make America’s Urban Core Sustainable in the Twenty-First Century” (if you click on the above link, it will take you to a TOC where the articles can be accessed) with some great sounding articles:

CITIZEN ENGAGEMENT IN THE
SHRINKING CITY: TOWARD
DEVELOPMENT JUSTICE IN AN
ERA OF GROWING INEQUALITY …………………………Barbara L. Bezdek 3
THE PROMISES AND PITFALLS
OF TIF IN THE ST. LOUIS
METROPOLITAN REGION: A
LOOK AT NEIGHBORHOOD
DISPARITIES ………………………………………………………..Sarah L. Coffin 57
ST. LOUIS BLUES: THE URBAN
CRISIS IN THE GATEWAY CITY………………………………….Colin Gordon 81
URBAN LAND BANKS AND THE
HOUSING FORECLOSURE AND
ABANDONMENT CRISIS……………………………………W. Dennis Keating 93
A CONTINUUM IN REMEDIES:
RECONNECTING VACANT
HOUSES TO THE MARKET…………………………………. James J. Kelly, Jr. 109

CITIZEN ENGAGEMENT IN THE
SHRINKING CITY: TOWARD
DEVELOPMENT JUSTICE IN AN
ERA OF GROWING INEQUALITY …………………………Barbara L. Bezdek 3
THE PROMISES AND PITFALLS
OF TIF IN THE ST. LOUIS
METROPOLITAN REGION: A
LOOK AT NEIGHBORHOOD
DISPARITIES ………………………………………………………..Sarah L. Coffin 57
ST. LOUIS BLUES: THE URBAN
CRISIS IN THE GATEWAY CITY………………………………….Colin Gordon 81
URBAN LAND BANKS AND THE
HOUSING FORECLOSURE AND
ABANDONMENT CRISIS……………………………………W. Dennis Keating 93
A CONTINUUM IN REMEDIES:
RECONNECTING VACANT
HOUSES TO THE MARKET…………………………………. James J. Kelly, Jr. 109

-many might make good sources and/or assignments related to Ferguson as well.

New Article: “Out in the Cold: The Failure of Tenant Enforcement of the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit”

New Article: Desiree Carole Hensley, Out in the Cold: The Failure of Tenant Enforcement of the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit, forthcoming Cinn. L. Rev.  Abstract below:

This Article seeks to start a conversation about the rights of the people who reside in Low-Income Housing Tax Credit units and how the law can be changed to better protect them; about their right not only to long-term housing at affordable rents, but to housing that is suitable for occupancy according to local or federal standards; about how they may enforce those rights; and about what policy makers can do to strengthen that enforcement.