Category Archives: housing

News Article: “Give the Homeless Homes”

News Article: James Surowiecki, Give the Homeless Homes, The New Yorker, Sept. 22, 2014

Call-for-Papers: “2015 Policy Summit on Housing, Human Capital & Inequality”

Call For Papers
2015 Policy Summit on Housing, Human Capital & Inequality

June 18-19, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

The Federal Reserve Banks of Cleveland, Philadelphia, and Richmond invite paper submissions for the 2015 Policy Summit on Housing, Human Capital, and Inequality, which will be held June 18-19 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The conference brings together researchers and practitioners interested in economic policy and development in low- and moderate-income communities.

OVERVIEW: As the nation continues its recovery from the Great Recession, it is important to understand how economic growth can more equitably benefit low- and moderate income individuals. With this in mind, and having selected a theme of economic growth and opportunity for the 2015 Policy Summit, we encourage the submission of high-quality research papers in the following areas: economic development, entrepreneurship, equitable development, recent trends in CRA lending (i.e., access to capital and credit for small businesses), workforce development, education reform, and related topics. In particular, we encourage the submission of research and work that is applicable to the Federal Reserve’s Third, Fourth, and Fifth Districts – comprising all of Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, North and South Carolina, Washington, D.C., and parts of New Jersey and Kentucky.

The Policy Summit is a now-biennial forum that attracts an audience of several hundred academics, bankers, elected officials, funders, policymakers, and practitioners from across the eastern United States. If your paper is selected, you will be asked to present at the Policy Summit, which will be held June 18-19, 2015, at the Omni William Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Travel and accommodation expenses per Federal Reserve guidelines will be covered for presenters.

PAPER SUBMISSION PROCEDURE: The deadline for submissions is 5:00 PM, Friday, December 19, 2014. Please submit an extended abstract or a draft of your research paper by this date to http://frb.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_dcZ52H3FFB3YdaR. We will notify submitting authors of accepted papers by January 31, 2015; full conference papers will be due June 4, 2015.

FURTHER INFORMATION: Please direct any questions about the call for papers to Dionissi Aliprantis at dionissi.aliprantis@clev.frb.org, Lisa Nelson at lisa.a.nelson@clev.frb.org, or Shannon McKay at shannon.mckay@rich.frb.org

New Report: “State of the Nation’s Housing 2014″

son_2014_coverNew Report: Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, State of the Nation’s Housing 2014 (2014).  [Note: the link takes you to the main page and from there you can open the whole report or individual sections.]

Symposium Issues published (in 2013): “Saving the Cities: How to Make America’s Urban Core Sustainable in the Twenty-First Century”

Symposium Issues published (in 2013): St. Louis U. Pub. L. Rev. published a symposium issue on “Saving the Cities: How to Make America’s Urban Core Sustainable in the Twenty-First Century” (if you click on the above link, it will take you to a TOC where the articles can be accessed) with some great sounding articles:

CITIZEN ENGAGEMENT IN THE
SHRINKING CITY: TOWARD
DEVELOPMENT JUSTICE IN AN
ERA OF GROWING INEQUALITY …………………………Barbara L. Bezdek 3
THE PROMISES AND PITFALLS
OF TIF IN THE ST. LOUIS
METROPOLITAN REGION: A
LOOK AT NEIGHBORHOOD
DISPARITIES ………………………………………………………..Sarah L. Coffin 57
ST. LOUIS BLUES: THE URBAN
CRISIS IN THE GATEWAY CITY………………………………….Colin Gordon 81
URBAN LAND BANKS AND THE
HOUSING FORECLOSURE AND
ABANDONMENT CRISIS……………………………………W. Dennis Keating 93
A CONTINUUM IN REMEDIES:
RECONNECTING VACANT
HOUSES TO THE MARKET…………………………………. James J. Kelly, Jr. 109

CITIZEN ENGAGEMENT IN THE
SHRINKING CITY: TOWARD
DEVELOPMENT JUSTICE IN AN
ERA OF GROWING INEQUALITY …………………………Barbara L. Bezdek 3
THE PROMISES AND PITFALLS
OF TIF IN THE ST. LOUIS
METROPOLITAN REGION: A
LOOK AT NEIGHBORHOOD
DISPARITIES ………………………………………………………..Sarah L. Coffin 57
ST. LOUIS BLUES: THE URBAN
CRISIS IN THE GATEWAY CITY………………………………….Colin Gordon 81
URBAN LAND BANKS AND THE
HOUSING FORECLOSURE AND
ABANDONMENT CRISIS……………………………………W. Dennis Keating 93
A CONTINUUM IN REMEDIES:
RECONNECTING VACANT
HOUSES TO THE MARKET…………………………………. James J. Kelly, Jr. 109

-many might make good sources and/or assignments related to Ferguson as well.

New Article: “Out in the Cold: The Failure of Tenant Enforcement of the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit”

New Article: Desiree Carole Hensley, Out in the Cold: The Failure of Tenant Enforcement of the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit, forthcoming Cinn. L. Rev.  Abstract below:

This Article seeks to start a conversation about the rights of the people who reside in Low-Income Housing Tax Credit units and how the law can be changed to better protect them; about their right not only to long-term housing at affordable rents, but to housing that is suitable for occupancy according to local or federal standards; about how they may enforce those rights; and about what policy makers can do to strengthen that enforcement.

New Article: “Federalism and Municipal Innovation: Lessons from the Fight Against Vacant Properties”

New Article: Benton C. Martin, Federalism and Municipal Innovation: Lessons from the Fight Against Vacant Properties, 46 The Urban Lawyer 361 (2014).  Abstract below:

Cities possess a far greater ability to be trailblazers on a national scale than local officials may imagine. Realizing this, city advocates continue to call for renewed recognition by state and federal officials of the benefits of creative local problem-solving. The goal is admirable but warrants caution. The key to successful local initiatives lies not in woolgathering about cooperation with other levels of government but in identifying potential conflicts and using hard work and political savvy to build constituencies and head off objections. To demonstrate that point, this Article examines the legal status of local governments and recent efforts to regulate vacant property through land banking and registration ordinances.

New Article: “‘Pennies on the Dollar': Reallocating Risk and Deficiency Judgment Liability”

New Article: Kristen Barnes, ‘Pennies on the Dollar': Reallocating Risk and Deficiency Judgment Liability, forthcoming S.C. L. Rev. 2014.  Abstract below:

Many homeowners are unaware that they face the prospect of crushing personal financial liability if they default on their mortgage loans. While owners may appreciate that they can lose their homes to the lender if they fail to make payments in accordance with their loan terms, many do not fully comprehend that the exposure they have under such circumstances does not end with relinquishing the financed property. In what are known as recourse states, if the lender forecloses and the foreclosure sale does not yield an amount sufficient to cover the borrower’s outstanding debt balance, the lender may file for a deficiency judgment against the borrower to make-up the difference. Whereas in the past, in many jurisdictions, lenders have resorted to this remedy, sparingly, there are signs that this lax approach is being abandoned. First and second mortgagees and private insurance companies are increasingly opting to aggressively pursue foreclosed homeowners for fear of leaving money on the table. To make matters worse, even in those situations where lenders determine that it is not economical for them to follow-up on collecting the debt from mortgagors where a deficiency exists, they are selling the deficiency judgment or the claim to debt collectors for pennies on the dollar. Looking at a representative sample of mortgage laws and practices in California, Illinois, and Florida, this paper argues for the prohibition of deficiency judgments in the residential mortgage loan context. The article also offers a proposal for anti-deficiency legislation. Homebuyers and lenders are not equal players in the mortgage loan transaction. The disadvantages of homeowners are particularly apparent in times of severe economic crisis, like the current great recession. Excising the option of deficiency judgments from the loan negotiation will help to address the glaring inequities between parties.

 

When Poverty Makes You Sick, a Lawyer Can Be the Cure – NYTimes.com

When Poverty Makes You Sick, a Lawyer Can Be the Cure – NYTimes.com.

In Connecticut, Breaking Barrier Between a Suburb and Public Housing – NYTimes.com

In Connecticut, Breaking Barrier Between a Suburb and Public Housing – NYTimes.com.

Foreclosure in Detroit: 43,634 Challenges to a City’s Revival – NYTimes.com

Foreclosure in Detroit: 43,634 Challenges to a City’s Revival – NYTimes.com.  Pretty cool — and depressing — graphic.  Would be good for class.