Article Review: “By All Means Possible” – Jotwell

Article Review: Toni Williams, “By All Means Possible,” Jotwell, Oct. 6, 2014 (reviewing Thomas Mitchell, Growing Inequality and Racial Economic Gaps56 How. L. J. 849(2013)).

NOTE: it is great to see that Jotwell has expanded its coverage such that there is more space for coverage of poverty related articles.

Call-for-Papers: “2015 Policy Summit on Housing, Human Capital & Inequality”

Call For Papers
2015 Policy Summit on Housing, Human Capital & Inequality

June 18-19, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

The Federal Reserve Banks of Cleveland, Philadelphia, and Richmond invite paper submissions for the 2015 Policy Summit on Housing, Human Capital, and Inequality, which will be held June 18-19 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The conference brings together researchers and practitioners interested in economic policy and development in low- and moderate-income communities.

OVERVIEW: As the nation continues its recovery from the Great Recession, it is important to understand how economic growth can more equitably benefit low- and moderate income individuals. With this in mind, and having selected a theme of economic growth and opportunity for the 2015 Policy Summit, we encourage the submission of high-quality research papers in the following areas: economic development, entrepreneurship, equitable development, recent trends in CRA lending (i.e., access to capital and credit for small businesses), workforce development, education reform, and related topics. In particular, we encourage the submission of research and work that is applicable to the Federal Reserve’s Third, Fourth, and Fifth Districts – comprising all of Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, North and South Carolina, Washington, D.C., and parts of New Jersey and Kentucky.

The Policy Summit is a now-biennial forum that attracts an audience of several hundred academics, bankers, elected officials, funders, policymakers, and practitioners from across the eastern United States. If your paper is selected, you will be asked to present at the Policy Summit, which will be held June 18-19, 2015, at the Omni William Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Travel and accommodation expenses per Federal Reserve guidelines will be covered for presenters.

PAPER SUBMISSION PROCEDURE: The deadline for submissions is 5:00 PM, Friday, December 19, 2014. Please submit an extended abstract or a draft of your research paper by this date to http://frb.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_dcZ52H3FFB3YdaR. We will notify submitting authors of accepted papers by January 31, 2015; full conference papers will be due June 4, 2015.

FURTHER INFORMATION: Please direct any questions about the call for papers to Dionissi Aliprantis at dionissi.aliprantis@clev.frb.org, Lisa Nelson at lisa.a.nelson@clev.frb.org, or Shannon McKay at shannon.mckay@rich.frb.org

Dept of Labor’s Unpaid Leave page with quick video

Here.

New Report: “State of the Nation’s Housing 2014″

son_2014_coverNew Report: Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, State of the Nation’s Housing 2014 (2014).  [Note: the link takes you to the main page and from there you can open the whole report or individual sections.]

For Property (and Poverty) folks: “Junior Scholar Mentoring Session, 2015 AALS Annual Meeting Property Section”

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS – DEADLINE EXTENDED TO OCTOBER 27 – AALS Section on Property, Junior Scholar Mentoring Session, 2015 AALS Annual Meeting Property Section Breakfast, Jan. 4, 2015.

Random DC in Dec./Jan. Photo.

Random DC in Dec./Jan. Photo.

The AALS Section on Property is pleased to invite junior faculty members to submit an abstract of a current writing project or an abstract outlining a possible paper idea.  Authors of selected abstracts will informally present their theses/ideas during a mentoring session to be held as one part of the Section breakfast at the 2015 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.  The breakfast will take place at 7:00 am on January 4, 2015, just before the Section’s 8:30 am panel program.  More details here: AALS Property Section Junior Scholar Mentoring Session Call for Abstracts with Deadline Extended.

New Report: “Poverty in the United States: 2013″

New Report: Thomas Gabe (Congressional Research Services), Poverty in the United States: 2013 (Sept. 25, 2014).

-Thanks to Susan Lewis and Billie Jo Kaufman for the heads up!

Woman A Leading Authority On What Shouldn’t Be In Poor People’s Grocery Carts | The Onion – America’s Finest News Source

Woman A Leading Authority On What Shouldn’t Be In Poor People’s Grocery Carts | The Onion – America’s Finest News Source.

No, college isn’t the answer. Reparations are. – The Washington Post

No, college isn’t the answer. Reparations are. – The Washington Post.

Symposium Issue Published: “50 Years After the “War on Poverty”: Evaluating Past Enactments & Innovative Approaches for Addressing Poverty in the 21st Century”

Symposium Issue Published by the Boston College Journal of Law and Social Justice: “50 Years After the “War on Poverty”: Evaluating Past Enactments & Innovative Approaches for Addressing Poverty in the 21st Century”:

Vol. XXXIV No. 2

50 Years After the “War on Poverty”: Evaluating Past Enactments & Innovative Approaches for Addressing Poverty in the 21st Century

Introduction by Emily F. Suski

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Deadbeat Dads & Welfare Queens: How Metaphor Shapes Poverty Law

by Ann Cammett

Abstract: Since the 1960s, racialized metaphors describing dysfunctional parents have been deployed by conservative policymakers to shape the way that the public views anti-poverty programs. The merging of race and welfare has eroded support for a robust social safety net, despite growing poverty and economic inequality throughout the land. This Article begins by describing the […]

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50 Years After the “War on Poverty”: Evaluating the Justice Gap in the Post-Disaster Context

by Davida Finger

Abstract: The Legal Services Corporation (“LSC”), formed as part of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s War on Poverty, was one of many initiatives aimed at providing low-income individuals with equal access to justice. Today, the increasing number of people living in poverty, coupled with decreased funding for legal services, has resulted in a significant justice gap […]

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Left Behind with No “IDEA”: Children with Disabilities Without Means

by Alex J. Hurder

Abstract: This Article examines the changes to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (“IDEA”), which were intended to reconcile the Act with the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, and the effect those changes have had on the education of children with disabilities. The Article highlights the important role that parents were given in […]

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Heal the Suffering Children: Fifty Years After the Declaration of War on Poverty

by Francine J. Lipman & Dawn Davis

Abstract: Fifty years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson declared the War on Poverty. Since then, the federal tax code has been a fundamental tool in providing financial assistance to poor working families. Even today, however, thirty-two million children live in families that cannot support basic living expenses, and sixteen million of those live in extreme […]

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From the “War on Poverty” to Pro Bono: Access to Justice Remains Elusive for Too Many, Including Our Veterans

by Patricia E. Roberts

Abstract: Fifty years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson launched the War on Poverty. The Legal Services Program of 1965, along with the Legal Services Corporation formed in 1974, considerably increased civil legal aid to America’s poor. Yet today, there is only one legal aid attorney for every 6,415 people living in poverty. Veterans, comprising 4.6% […]

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Four stories of the working poor – Business – The Boston Globe

Four stories of the working poor – Business – The Boston Globe.