Pulitzer-Prize Article on Heroin Addiction in Cincinnati

Here. Worth reading. Not strictly poverty law but related enough and well done.

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Cass Sunstein weighs in on Trump’s Executive Order on Poverty: Trump’s Promising Plan to Link Welfare to Work

Here: Cass R. Sunstein, Trump’s Promising Plan to Link Welfare to Work, Bloomberg.net, Apr. 24, 2018. Needless-to-say, I do not agree. My take on the order is here. I think the best response to Sunstein on this would be to highlight that political reality matters. Sunstein doesn’t seem to understand what the emphasis on work requirements in the executive order is really about.

New Article: The Everyday Economic Violence of Black Life

New Article: Renee Hatcher, The Everyday Economic Violence of Black Life, Journal for Affordable Housing and Community Development Law, Volume 25, Number 3, 2017. Abstract below:

A book review of Ferguson’s Fault Lines by Kimberly Norwood. In analyzing the thirteen chapters, the review highlights the central themes of spatial racism, uneven development, and discriminatory practices in Ferguson and the greater St. Louis metropolitan region. In doing so, the review argues that discriminatory development practices create unequal access to education, employment, transportation, health outcomes, and life expectancies, based on race and zip code. These development practices also give rise to and enable discriminatory policing.

The review ultimately argues that state-sanctioned discriminatory policies of both physical and economic violence are intertwined, cyclical, and compounding. In looking to solutions, I advocate that community-driven strategies that address historical discrimination and inequality will move the needle towards progress. By the same token, local housing and development policy makers should employ a racial equity impact assessment for all future investments and policies and take affirmative action to address the geography of inequality that they have helped to create and sustain.

Blog Post: Is the Left’s Skepticism about Zoning’s Increasing Rents like the Right’s Skepticism about Global Warming?

DSC_0072Blog Post: Rick Hills, Is the Left’s Skepticism about Zoning’s Increasing Rents like the Right’s Skepticism about Global Warming?, PrawfsBlawg, Apr. 19, 2018.

Report: Foreclosed: Destruction of Black Wealth During the Obama Presidency

Report: Ryan Cooper & Matt Bruenig, Foreclosed: Destruction of Black Wealth During the Obama Presidency (2017) [about housing wealth].

New Book: Moving toward Integration: The Past and Future of Fair Housing

MTI.jpgNew Book: Richard H. Sander, Yana A. Kucheva, and Jonathan M. Zasloff, Moving toward Integration: The Past and Future of Fair Housing (2018). Overview below:

Reducing residential segregation is the best way to reduce racial inequality in the United States. African American employment rates, earnings, test scores, even longevity all improve sharply as residential integration increases. Yet far too many participants in our policy and political conversations have come to believe that the battle to integrate America’s cities cannot be won. Richard SanderYana Kucheva, and Jonathan Zasloff write that the pessimism surrounding desegregation in housing arises from an inadequate understanding of how segregation has evolved and how policy interventions have already set many metropolitan areas on the path to integration.

Scholars have debated for decades whether America’s fair housing laws are effective. Moving toward Integration provides the most definitive account to date of how those laws were shaped and implemented and why they had a much larger impact in some parts of the country than others. It uses fresh evidence and better analytic tools to show when factors like exclusionary zoning and income differences between blacks and whites pose substantial obstacles to broad integration, and when they do not.

Through its interdisciplinary approach and use of rich new data sources, Moving toward Integration offers the first comprehensive analysis of American housing segregation. It explains why racial segregation has been resilient even in an increasingly diverse and tolerant society, and it demonstrates how public policy can align with demographic trends to achieve broad housing integration within a generation.

Op-Ed: Poverty is moving to the suburbs. The war on poverty hasn’t followed.

Op-Ed: Aaron Wiener, Poverty is moving to the suburbs. The war on poverty hasn’t followed, Wash. Post, Apr. 5, 2018.

Call-for-Papers: Including Children and Adolescents in Progress for the SDGs: Understanding and Addressing Exclusion among Poor Children

Call-for-Papers: Including Children and Adolescents in Progress for the SDGs: Understanding and Addressing Exclusion among Poor Children, The New School, New York, USA, Oct. 11-12, 2018.

CRS Report: An Introduction to Poverty Measurement (2017)

A 2017 Congressional Research Services report perhaps of interest, Joseph Dalaker, An Introduction to Poverty Measurement (March 9, 2017).

Op-Ed/Harvard Law Review Blog entry: “Pulling from a Dated Playbook: President Trump’s Executive Order on Poverty”

Trump-Signing-Executive-OrderEzra Rosser, Pulling from a Dated Playbook: President Trump’s Executive Order on Poverty, Harvard Law Review Blog, Apr. 18, 2018.