Article: Racial Subjugation by Another Name? Using the Links in the School-to-Prison Pipeline to Reassess State Takeover District Performance

Article: Steven L. Nelson, Racial Subjugation by Another Name? Using the Links in the School-to-Prison Pipeline to Reassess State Takeover District Performance, 9 Geo. J. L. & Mod. Crit. Race Persp. (2017).

The state takeover of locally governed schools in predominately black communities has not disrupted the racial subjugation of black people in the United States. Using proportional analyses and the cities of Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans as sites, the researcher finds that state takeover districts have not consistently disrupted the school-to-prison pipeline for black students in urban settings. Furthermore, the researcher found little evidence that would support broader and more intentional efforts to combat the over disciplining of black students in the United States Department of Education’s proposed rules for implementing the Every Student Succeeds Act, the most recent reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. In fact, the legislation perpetuates strategies that have aided the creation of the school-to-prison pipeline and supplies only strong recommendations to replace strategies that have compounded the harm of the school-to-prison pipeline. This finding is important in the context of education reform, particularly as researchers begin to question the motives and results of contemporary education reform. Moreover, this work is important to the current scholarly discussions that consider the many civil rights that black communities are required to exchange for the prospect of better schools.

Symposium Issue: “The School to Prison Pipeline” – Ariz. St. L.J. 2016

Symposium Issue: “The School to Prison Pipeline” – Ariz. St. L.J. 2016.

Tiffani Darden, Exploring the spectrum: how the law may advance a social movement, 48 Ariz. St. L.J. 261 (2016).

Laura R. McNeal, Managing our blind spot: the role of bias in the school-to-prison pipeline, 48 Ariz. St. L.J. 285 (2016).

Jason P. Nance, Dismantling the school-to-prison pipeline: tools for change, 48 Ariz. St. L.J. 313 (2016).

Claire Raj, The misidentification of children with disabilities: a harm with no foul, 48 Ariz. St. L.J. 373 (2016).

New Article: “A Left of Liberal Interpretation of Trump’s “Big” Win, Part One: Neoliberalism”

New Article: Duncan Kennedy, A Left of Liberal Interpretation of Trump’s “Big” Win, Part One: Neoliberalism, 1 Nevada L.J. Forum 98 (2017).

New Article: “Special Economic Zones in the United States: From Colonial Charters, to Foreign-Trade Zones, Toward USSEZs”

New Article: Tom W. Bell, Special Economic Zones in the United States: From Colonial Charters, to Foreign-Trade Zones, Toward USSEZs, 64 Buff. L. Rev. 959 (2016).  Abstract below:

Special economic zones (SEZs) have a long and complicated relationship with the United States. The lineage of the country runs back to proto-SEZs, created when Old World governments sold entrepreneurs charters to build for-profit colonies in the New World, such as Jamestown and New Amsterdam. In more recent times, though, the United States has lagged behind the rest of the globe in tapping the potential of SEZs, which have exploded in number, types, territory, and population. True, the US hosts a large and growing number of Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZs), but these do little more than exempt select companies from federal customs obligations. Elsewhere, SEZs have done much more to increase jurisdictional competition and improve citizens’ lives. Consider the SEZs that spread from Hong Kong throughout China, lifting tens of millions of people out of poverty in the process, or the huge private developments now taking root in Africa, the Middle East, and India. This paper proposes that the United States combine the best of foreign and domestic policies to create a new generation of SEZs. These United States Special Economic Zones (USSEZs) would arise on federally owned property, such as lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management, and generate sorely needed public funds by selling territorial exemptions from select state and federal taxes, laws, and regulations. Through USSEZs, special jurisdictions might bring economic growth, human welfare, and individual freedom back to America.

New Issue of Pathways: “Bold Visions”

BoldVisions_cover_smallNew Issue of Pathways: Stanford Center Poverty and Inequality, Pathways Magazine: “Bold Visions: Blueprints for Ending Poverty,” Spring 2017.

Job Opportunity: “Counsel, Economic Justice Project” – Lawyer’s Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

Job Opportunity: “Counsel, Economic Justice Project” – Lawyer’s Committee for Civil Rights Under Law.  Counsel Economic Justice Project job posting

New Article: “Dangerous Defendants”

Sandra G. Mayson, Dangerous Defendants, University of Pennsylvania Law School, Public Law Research Paper No. 16-30 (2016).

Bail reform is underway — but it is proceeding on shaky ground. The reform model, which deploys actuarial risk assessment to identify “high-risk” defendants, assumes that the state has the prerogative to detain or control dangerous defendants. This assumption is not new. But it is anomalous. In general, we do not permit the state to restrain sane, responsible adults solely to stop them from committing hypothetical future crimes, even those who are high-risk. The reform movement’s focus on danger thus crystallizes a fundamental question about pretrial policy: What justifies the state in restraining defendants for dangerousness before trial if we would prohibit the same restraint for equally dangerous members of the public? Although there is an extensive literature on preventive detention, neither the Supreme Court nor prior scholarship has focused on this comparative question. This Article endeavors to answer it. It makes the first effort to articulate and evaluate potential justifications for subjecting defendants to restraint that we would forbid for non-defendants who pose an equal risk. The Article explores doctrinal, deontological and instrumentalist justifications, but ultimately rejects them. It contends that pretrial restraint for dangerousness can only be justified at the risk threshold where we would authorize equivalent restraint of a member of the population at large. Communities, policymakers and courts should therefore determine what they believe this threshold to be, then ensure that pretrial risk assessment and management are tailored to it.

Jobs Databases

Below is a partial list of job databases for students and graduates looking for jobs.  Note, some of these are general databases, not public interest focused.

Public Service Jobs Directory

Database for public service legal careers.

Indeed

Public interest attorney job search

Law Crossing

Database for law-related jobs; public interest attorney job search.

Public Sector Lawyers Division of the American Bar Association

Contains a Public Lawyer Career Center, but you must be an ABA member (free for students to join).

Idealist

Public interest attorney job search.

National Legal Aid & Defender Association

Jobs in legal services, public defender offices, private public interest firms, nonprofits and academia. Searchable by job type and state.

OneJustice

California-centered organization that engages all segments of the legal community and is working to expand the resources to serve the low-income Californians who turn to OneJustice legal services nonprofits to access life’s most basic necessities.

NALP Directory

Directory of legal employers, by NALP.

Non-Profit Jobs

Job database for jobs in the non-profit sector, includes JD- or JD-preferred jobs.

Work for Good

Database with social justice jobs. Link is a search for public policy/administration jobs.

Philanthropy News Digest

Database with job openings at tax-exempt organizations, including JD-only jobs.

Hill Zoo

Database for jobs on Capitol Hill, but also includes a section for jobs off the Hill.

Public Service Careers

Database for careers in the public service, geared for recent graduates.

Public Interest Law Initiative

List of paid internship opportunities in public interest law.

Opportunities in Public Affairs

Database for Capitol Hill Jobs, legislative jobs, and public affairs and PR jobs in the Washington, DC area and nationwide.

Washington College of Law: Useful Links: Public Interest

Includes links to job databases in a variety of fields, including environmental law, human rights law, labor law, and animal law.

Martindale

Database of information about attorneys and law firms around the world. To locate public interest law firms, click Advanced Search and select the Law Firms & Organizations tab. Use the practice areas field to select areas that are typical in public interest law firms such as civil rights, education law, elder law, immigration, Indians and native populations.

 

Collection of Advice Letters to Public Interest Law Students

I decided it was worth collecting some of the advice that has been given to public interest law students so that such writing could be more easily shared with law students.  Here are three such resources, but if anyone knows of other “letters,” please let me know and I will add them.

Fact v. Fiction: Public Interest Careers

FAQ from Yale Law that answers a student’s most pressing questions about a career in public interest law.

Letters to a Law Students Interested in Social Justice, by William P. Quigley

Public interest giant writes a fictional letter to a law student interested in public interest law.

Doing the Right Thing: How to Get into Public Interest Law, by Harrison Barnes

Article on how to get into public interest law and why it’s important. From LawCrossing.

 

Public Interest Job Search Guides

With the goal of helping students (and recent graduates) find public interest job search guides, below is a list of resources and guides that might be worth checking out or sharing with students.

American Bar Association: Public Interest Law Links

Provides links with initiatives and information on how to start a career in dozens of practice areas.

Harvard Law School Public Interest Links

Comprehensive list of links for job sites in the: general public interest, general nonprofits, federal government, state government, international public interest, international governmental organizations, and has separate pages for about a dozen specialty areas. Each section/topic area has dozens of links to guides and databases.

Open Legal Services

Provides affordable legal services to low and moderate income people, and provides a list of similar organizations nationwide to their own that offer legal services to individuals and other nonprofits on a sliding scale.

NALP

Professional association that advises students and schools. Includes a list of public service initiatives, as well as employment guides, conferences, and a new bulletin.

Federal Legal Employment Opportunities Guide (2012-2013)

Guide to find federal legal employment, by PSJD.

Equal Justice Works

The Equal Justice Network is an online meeting place, information source and connection mechanism for lawyers and other advocates committed to equal justice.

Careers in Public Interest Law, by the James L. Petigru Public Interest Law Society

Guide to careers in public interest law, finding clerkships and internships, and a resource guide.

Harvard Law: Public Interest Job Resources and Timeline for 3Ls

Includes career and application guides, fellowship information, and timelines for when and how to apply.

Harvard Law: Public Interest Job Resources and Timeline for 2Ls

Includes internship application guides, fellowship information, and timelines for when and how to apply.

Harvard Law: Public Interest Job Resources and Timeline for 1Ls

Includes internship application guides, fellowship information, and timelines for when and how to apply.

Harvard Law: Career & Application Guides

Links to career and application guides, by subject area. Includes guides for: fellowship and grant applications, administrative law, children’s rights, civil rights/ civil liberties, education law, environmental law, health law, immigration & refugee law, international development, intellectual property/cyber law, labor and employment, LGBT rights, national security, reproductive rights & justice, women’s rights.

Inside Miami Law: Public Interest Job Search Information

Includes links for public interest job resources, job fairs, summer opportunities, funding sources, and post-graduate fellowships. Provides an overview of public interest law and the different sectors available to students and lawyers.

Columbia Law: Social Justice Initiatives

Provides guides and links for public interest law. Includes practice-area specific guides.

Capital Defenders

A list compiled by Boalt Law School of law student internship opportunities (both summer and year-round) in offices around the country that are engaged in the defense of death row inmates or capitally charged defendants.

One World

Public interest law job search on a website similar to idealist.org.  Better for jobs abroad.

Lewis & Clark Law: Public Interest Careers

Includes guides and resources for those seeking public interest law jobs.

NALP: Finding and Funding International Public Service Opportunities

Guide for students who are interested in public service abroad or public international law.

NYU Law: Public Defender Handbook

Handbook for those who want to be public defenders.

Chicago-Kent Law: Public Interest Resources and Links

Resources and links for public interest law. Includes Chicago-specific resources.

National Lawyers Guild

Social justice organization, provides information on fellowships and lists opportunities for students.

Public Interest Law Initiative

Resources for students and lawyers, to help establish careers in the public interest. Includes events, articles, resources, guides, and links to databases.

University of Georgia Law: Government and Public Interest Law

Resources for students, including Georgia-specific organizations

Loyola Law: Public Interest Job Search Resources

Resources for students, including resume and cover letter tips, job fairs, and funding and debt relief.

Washington College of Law: Office of Public Interest

Resources for students, some of which is password-protected.

PILnet: The Global Network for Public Interest Law

Global network with offices worldwide that provides tools, resources, and guides to public interest lawyers. Useful for guides about pro bono law in Europe and Asia.

-Thanks to my research assistant who compiled this list.