Category Archives: Children

Blog Post: “The Economics of Family Behavior”

Blog Post: June Carbone & Naomi Cahn, The Economics of Family Behavior, Inst. for Family Studies, Feb. 8, 2018.

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Op-Ed: “Single Mothers Are Not the Problem”

Op-Ed: David Brady et al., Single Mothers Are Not the Problem, N.Y. Times, Feb. 11, 2018.

New Article: “A Poor Mother’s Right to Privacy: A Review”

New Article: Danielle Keats Citron, A Poor Mother’s Right to Privacy: A Review, 98 B.U. L. Rev. (2018, Forthcoming). Abstract below:

Collecting personal data is a feature of daily life. Businesses, advertisers, agencies, and law enforcement amass massive reservoirs of our personal data. This state of affairs—what I am calling the “collection imperative”—is justified in the name of efficiency, convenience, and security. The unbridled collection of personal data, meanwhile, leads to abuses. Public and private entities have disproportionate power over individuals and groups whose information they have amassed. Nowhere is that power disparity more evident than for the state’s surveillance of the indigent. Poor mothers, in particular, have vanishingly little privacy. Whether or not poor mothers receive subsidized prenatal care, the existential state of poor mothers is persistent and indiscriminate state surveillance.

Professor Khiara Bridges’s book, The Poverty of Privacy Rights, advances the project of securing privacy for the most vulnerable among us. It shows how the moral construction of poverty animates the state’s surveillance of poor mothers, rather than legitimate concerns about prenatal care. It argues that poor mothers have a constitutional right not to be known if the state’s data collection efforts demean and humiliate them for no good reason. The Poverty of Privacy Rights provides an important lens for rethinking the data collection imperative more generally. It supplies a theory not only on which a constitutional right to information privacy can be built but also on which positive law and norms can develop. Concepts of reciprocity may provide another analytical tool to understand a potential right to be as unknown to government as it is to us.

News Coverage: “Groundbreaking empirical research shows where innovation really comes from: Breaking down barriers for underrepresented kids could quadruple America’s pool of inventors”

News Coverage: Matthew Yglesias, Groundbreaking empirical research shows where innovation really comes from: Breaking down barriers for underrepresented kids could quadruple America’s pool of inventors, Vox.com, Dec. 5, 2017.

The same research is also covered here: America’s Lost Einsteins.

New(ish) Article: “The Effects of Exposure to Better Neighborhoods on Children: New Evidence from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment”

New Article: Raj Chetty et al., The Effects of Exposure to Better Neighborhoods on Children: New Evidence from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment, 106 Am. Econ. Rev. 855 (2016). Abstract below:

The Moving to Opportunity (MTO) experiment offered randomly selected families housing vouchers to move from high-poverty housing projects to lower-poverty neighborhoods. We analyze MTO’s impacts on children’s long-term outcomes using tax data. We find that moving to a lower-poverty neighborhood when young (before age 13) increases college attendance and earnings and reduces single parenthood rates. Moving as an adolescent has slightly negative impacts, perhaps because of disruption effects. The decline in the gains from moving with the age when children move suggests that the duration of exposure to better environments during childhood is an important determinant of children’s long-term outcomes. (JEL I31, I38, J13, R23, R38)

New Article: “Unaccompanied and Excluded from Food Security: A Call for the Inclusion of Immigrant Youth Twenty Years after Welfare Reform”

New Article: Claire R. Thomas & Ernie Collette, Unaccompanied and Excluded from Food Security: A Call for the Inclusion of Immigrant Youth Twenty Years after Welfare Reform, 31 Geo. Immigration L. Rev. 197 (2017). Abstract below:

The purpose of this paper is to advocate for immediate access to SNAP (Food Stamps) benefits for immigrant kids applying for and granted Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS) in both New York State and at the federal level through the historical background of exclusionary immigration policies, an examination of PRWORA, and the application of a case study. First, this paper will briefly discuss the historical background of U.S. immigration policy as exclusionary of certain groups of immigrants, particularly those thought to become a public charge, and the correlation between anti-immigrant sentiment and the passage of laws restricting access to public benefits. Next, this paper will examine the SNAP sections of the PRWORA in great depth, after almost twenty years since its passage and enactment, through the review of pre-PRWORA immigrant eligibility rules and the expansion of post-PRWORA categories since 1996.

News Coverage: “West End condo would not only have “poor door,” but poor playground”

Here.

New Article: “Assessing President Trump’s Child Care Proposals”

Batchelder, Lily L. and Maag, Elaine and Huang, Chye-Ching and Horton, Emily, Assessing President Trump’s Child Care Proposals (October 30, 2017). National Tax Journal, Forthcoming. [Abstract below]

During the presidential campaign, Donald Trump proposed three tax benefits for child care: a credit for low-income families, an above-the-line deduction, and tax-subsidized savings accounts. While these proposals laudably bring attention to the heavy burden that child care costs place on many low- and middle-income families, they are a case study in how not to reform child care policy. They are unduly complicated, arbitrarily exclude certain low-income families, deliver support well after child care payments are due, and provide the largest benefits to higher-income families who need the least help.

News Coverage: “San Diego Unified Sends Parents Who Can’y Pay for School Bus Rides to a Collections Agency”

Mario Koran, San Diego Unified Sends Parents Who Can’y Pay for School Bus Rides to a Collections Agency, Voice of San Diego, November 8, 2017. [“California is one of a dozen states that allows school districts to charge parents fees for bus rides to school.”]

Blog post: “Repeal of Child Tax Credit For Taxpayers Without a Voice, Is A Great Way to Defund the Success of America’s Kids”

Blog post: Francine Lipman, Repeal of Child Tax Credit For Taxpayers Without a Voice, Is A Great Way to Defund the Success of America’s Kids, Surley Subgroup, Nov. 19, 2017.