Category Archives: Criminalization of Poverty

News Article: “The Injustice of Making Kids Pay”

News Article: Editorial Board, “The Injustice of Making Kids Pay,” New York Times, Sept. 5, 2016.

 

New Book: “From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America”

hintonNew Book: Elizabeth Hinton, From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America (2016).

News Coverage: “Court Costs Entrap Nonwhite, Poor Juvenile Offenders”

News Coverage: Erik Eckholm, Court Costs Entrap Nonwhite, Poor Juvenile Offenders, New York Times, Aug. 31, 2016.

News Coverage: “Judges Across The Country Are Shaking Down Poor People”

News Coverage: Bryce Covert, Judges Across The Country Are Shaking Down Poor People, Think Progress, Aug. 24, 2016 [extended article on court fees].

Blog Posts on Ban the Box by Noah Zatz

Three Blog Posts on Ban the Box by Noah Zatz:

BoxBan the Box and Perverse Consequences, Part I; Ban the Box and Perverse Consequences, Part II; and Ban the Box and Perverse Consequences, Part III.

See also this Atlantic Magazine article.

 

New Article: “The Influence of Exile”

New Article: Sara K. Rankin, The Influence of Exile, 76 Md. L. Rev. __ (forthcoming 2016).  Abstract below:

Belonging is a fundamental human need. But human instincts are Janus-faced: equally strong is the drive to exclude. This exclusive impulse, which this Article calls “the influence of exile,” reaches beyond interpersonal dynamics when empowered groups use laws and policies to restrict marginalized groups’ access to public space. Jim Crow, Anti-Okie, and Sundown Town laws are among many notorious examples. But the influence of exile perseveres today: it has found a new incarnation in the stigmatization and spatial regulation of visible poverty, as laws that criminalize and eject visibly poor people from public space proliferate across the nation. These laws reify popular attitudes toward visible poverty, harming not only the visibly poor, but also society as a whole. This Article seeks to expose and explain how the influence of exile operates; in doing so, it argues against the use of the criminal justice system as a response to visible poverty. In its place, the Article argues for more effective and efficient responses that take as their starting point an individual right to exist in public space, which for many visibly poor people is tantamount to a right to exist at all.

Editor’s Note: I just finished reading this article and it is interesting not only for its text, but for the rich sources collected in the footnotes that give examples of demonizing and blaming the visible poor. Congrats Sara!

New Report: “Get To Work or Go To Jail: Workplace Rights Under Threat”

New Report: Noah Zatz, Tia Koonse, Theresa Zhen, Lucero Herrera, Han Lu, Steven Shafer, and Blake Valenta, Get To Work or Go To Jail: Workplace Rights Under Threat (2016).

New Article: “In Louisiana, The Poor Lack Legal Defense”

New Article: Campbell Robertson, “In Louisiana, The Poor Lack Legal Defense” – The New York Times

New Article: “After Incarceration, What Next?”

New Article: “After Incarceration, What Next?” – The American Prospect

New Article: “Court Fees Create ‘Endless Cycle Of Debt’ For Poor”

New Article: “Court Fees Create ‘Endless Circle Of Debt’ For Poor” – The Crime Report