Category Archives: Economic Mobility

Op-Ed: “As A Poor Kid From The Rust Belt, Yale Law School Brought Me Face-to-face With Radical Inequality”

Op-Ed: J.D. Vance, As A Poor Kid From The Rust Belt, Yale Law School Brought Me Face-to-face With Radical Inequality, Huffington Post, 6/29/2016.

News Coverage: “Can Neighborhoods Be Revitalized Without Gentrifying Them?”

News Coverage: “Can Neighborhoods Be Revitalized Without Gentrifying Them?

News Coverage: Colleges Shifting Narrative From Low-Income to First-Generation Students – The Atlantic

News Coverage: Colleges Shifting Narrative From Low-Income to First-Generation Students – The Atlantic

New Article: “No Caste Here? Toward a Structural Critique of American Education”

New Article: Daniel Kiel, No Caste Here? Toward a Structural Critique of American Education,  119 Penn St. L. Rev. 611 (2015).  Abstract below:

In his famous dissent in Plessy v. Ferguson, Justice John Marshall Harlan argued that in the United States, there was “no caste here.” Justice Harlan was rejecting the idea that American society operated to assign preordained outcomes to individuals based upon classifications, including racial classifications. This Article questions whether Justice Harlan’s aspirational assertion accurately reflects contemporary American education. Identifying: (1) multiple classification mechanisms, all of which have disproportionate racial effects, and (2) structural legal, political, and practical impediments to reform, the Article argues that the American education system does more to maintain the nation’s historical racial hierarchy than to disrupt it. This is so, the Article suggests, despite popular agreement with the casteless ideal and popular belief that education can provide the opportunity to transcend social class. By building the framework for a broad structural critique, the Article suggests that a failure to acknowledge and address structural flaws will preclude successful comprehensive reform with more equitable outcomes.

New Article: “The Striking Power Of Poverty To Turn Young Boys Into Jobless Men”

New Article: “The Striking Power of Poverty To Turn Young Boys Into Jobless Men” – The Washington Post

New Article: “Some Cities Are Still More Unequal Than Others – An Update”

New Article: “Some Cities Are Still More Unequal Than Others – An Update” – Brookings

New Article: “Will Inequality Ever Stop Growing”

New Article: “Will Inequality Ever Stop Growing?” – The Atlantic

New Article: “All Hollowed Out”

New Article: “All Hollowed Out” – The Atlantic

New Article: “Education-as-Inheritance Crowds Out Education-as-Opportunity”

DSC_0090New Article: Palma Joy Strand, Education-as-Inheritance Crowds Out Education-as-Opportunity, 59 St. Louis L.J. 283 (2015).  Abstract below:

Since the founding of our nation, education has been valued as a preeminent means of achieving equal opportunity and the social mobility of democracy. A generation ago, however, Professor John Langbein diagnosed a different function of education: the transmission of wealth from one generation to the next.

In this article, I examine education as intergenerational wealth transmission through a critical lens. My primary inquiry is whether the traditional role of education-as-opportunity is being “crowded out” by education-as-inheritance.

The article first examines and verifies Langbein’s diagnosis: Education today is indeed an important way to transfer wealth intergenerationally. The article next documents lack of access to education for those without economic resources, a lack of access that extends from birth through college. The article concludes by identifying flagging public investment in education as creating a vacuum that is being filled by the increasingly privatized provision of education. This privatized investment constitutes an indirect but real form of intergenerational wealth transmission, which dampens social mobility.

Countering this trend, increasing social mobility will necessitate a shift away from education-as-inheritance toward education-as-opportunity. More progressive public investment at all levels of education is called for to facilitate this shift.

News Coverage: An hereditary meritocracy | The Economist

An hereditary meritocracy | The Economist.