Category Archives: Economic Mobility

New Chart Book: “Chart Book: TANF at 20”

New Chart Book: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, “Chart Book: TANF at 20,” Aug. 5, 2016.

News Article: “What Happens When a Homeless Shelter Opens in a Gentrifying Neighborhood?”

News Article: Allegra Kirkland, “What Happens When a Homeless Shelter Opens in a Gentrifying Neighborhood?,” The Nation, Sept. 1, 2016 [despite protests from local Brooklynites, there are still plans for developing new businesses alongside the proposed homeless shelter].

New Article: “Separate and Unequal: The Dimensions and Consequences of Safety Net Decentralization in the U.S. 1994-2014”

New Article: Sarah K. Bruch, Marcia K. Meyers, Janet C. Gornick, “Separate and Unequal: The Dimensions and Consequences of Safety Net Decentralization in the U.S. 1994-2014,” Institute for Research on Poverty (Aug. 2016).

In this paper, we examine the dimensions and consequences of decentralized social safety net policies. We consider the adequacy of benefits and inclusiveness of receipt for eleven federal-state programs that constitute the core of safety net provision for working age adults and families: cash assistance, food assistance, health insurance, child support, child care, preschool/early education, unemployment insurance, state income taxes, cash assistance work assistance, disability assistance, and housing assistance. In the first part of the paper we examine the extent of cross-state inequality in social provision. We find substantial variation across states; variation that is consistent with policy design differences in state discretion; and at levels equal to or greater than variation across the European countries that have been recognized as having different welfare regimes. In the second section, we turn to an analysis of change over time (1994 to 2014) examining four dimensions of convergence: degree, location of change, direction of change, and scope. We find both decreases (retrenchment) and increases (expansions) of provision, a handful of cases of convergence (decreasing inequality) and divergence (increasing inequality), and a great deal of synchronous change and persistence in the magnitude of cross state inequalities.

News Article: “Obama’s Trickle-Up Economics”

News Article: Paul Krugman, “Obama’s Trickle-Up Economics,” New York Times, Sept. 16, 2016 [summarizing the Census Bureau report showing Obama’s progressive economic policies have been largely successful].

News Article: “The Failure to Talk Frankly About Poverty”

News Article: New York Times Editorial Board, “The Failure to Talk Frankly About Poverty,” New York Times, Sept. 13, 2016.

New Article: “Employment Rights in the Platform Economy: Getting Back to Basics”

New Article: Brishen Rogers, Employment Rights in the Platform Economy: Getting Back to Basics, 10 Harv. L. & Pol’y Rev. 479 (2016).

The employment status of workers for “platform economy” firms such as Uber, Lyft, TaskRabbit and Handy has become a significant legal and political issue. Lawsuits against several such companies allege that they have misclassified workers as independent contractors to evade employment law obligations. Various lawmakers and commentators, pointing to the complexity of existing tests for employment and the costs of employment duties, have responded with proposals to limit platform companies’ liability. This article steps into such debates, using the status of Uber drivers as a test case. It argues that Uber drivers may not fall neatly into either the “employee” or the “independent contractor” category under existing tests. Nevertheless, an important principle underlying those tests — the anti-domination principle — strongly indicates that the drivers are employees. That principle also indicates that proposals to limit platform economy firms’ liabilities are premature at best and misguided at worst.

 

News Coverage: “A Question About Friends Reveals a Lot About Class Divides”

News Coverage: Damon Darlin, “A Question About Friends Reveals a Lot About Class Divides,” New York Times, Sept. 1, 2016.

Op-Ed: “As A Poor Kid From The Rust Belt, Yale Law School Brought Me Face-to-face With Radical Inequality”

Op-Ed: J.D. Vance, As A Poor Kid From The Rust Belt, Yale Law School Brought Me Face-to-face With Radical Inequality, Huffington Post, 6/29/2016.

News Coverage: “Can Neighborhoods Be Revitalized Without Gentrifying Them?”

News Coverage: “Can Neighborhoods Be Revitalized Without Gentrifying Them?

News Coverage: Colleges Shifting Narrative From Low-Income to First-Generation Students – The Atlantic

News Coverage: Colleges Shifting Narrative From Low-Income to First-Generation Students – The Atlantic