Category Archives: Economic Mobility

New Report: Measuring Mobility from Poverty

New Report: Gregory Acs et al., Measuring Mobility from Poverty (US Partnership on Mobility from Poverty, 2018).

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New Book: Collaborative Capitalism in American Cities: Reforming Urban Market Regulations

CC RashmiNew Book: Rashmi Dyal-Chand, Collaborative Capitalism in American Cities: Reforming Urban Market Regulations (Cambridge University Press, 2018). Overview below:

In many American cities, the urban cores still suffer. Poverty and unemployment remain endemic, despite policy initiatives aimed at systemic solutions. Rashmi Dyal-Chand’s research has focused on how businesses in some urban cores are succeeding despite the challenges. Using three examples of urban collaborative capitalism, this book extrapolates a set of lessons about sharing. It argues that sharing can fuel business development and growth. Sharing among businesses can be critical for their economic survival. Sharing can also produce a particularly stable form of economic growth by giving economic stability to employees. As the examples in this book show, sharing can allow American businesses to remain competitive while returning more wealth to their workers, and this more collaborative approach can help solve the problems of urban underdevelopment and poverty.

Editor’s Note: I am a huge fan of everything Rashmi does so even though I have not read this yet, I highly recommend this as a book that is sure to be great. Congrats Rashmi!

Op-Ed/Harvard Law Review Blog entry: “Pulling from a Dated Playbook: President Trump’s Executive Order on Poverty”

Trump-Signing-Executive-OrderEzra Rosser, Pulling from a Dated Playbook: President Trump’s Executive Order on Poverty, Harvard Law Review Blog, Apr. 18, 2018.

Op-Ed: Don’t ignore class when addressing racial gaps in intergenerational mobility — by William Julius Wilson

Op-Ed: William Julius Wilson, Don’t ignore class when addressing racial gaps in intergenerational mobility, Brookings Social Mobility Memo, April 12, 2018.

Interactive Tool: Income Mobility Charts for Girls, Asian-Americans and Other Groups. Or Make Your Own.

Interactive Tool: Emily Badger et al, Income Mobility Charts for Girls, Asian-Americans and Other Groups. Or Make Your Own., N.Y. Times, Mar. 27, 2018 [a follow up from the earlier article that focused on black male economic mobility that is equally strong in terms of insights and graphics].

News Coverage: “Extensive Data Shows Punishing Reach of Racism for Black Boys”

News Coverage: Emily Badger et al., Extensive Data Shows Punishing Reach of Racism for Black Boys, N.Y. Times, Mar. 19, 2018. [Note this is a very well done article with amazing graphics. Worth checking out and sharing with students.]

New Article: “The ‘Free College’ Illusion: How State Tuition Support Programs Are Widening the Opportunity Gap”

New Article: Lauren A. DiMartino, The ‘Free College’ Illusion: How State Tuition Support Programs Are Widening the Opportunity Gap, 25 Geo. J. Poverty L. & Pol’y 257 (2018). Abstract below:

In recent years, educational efforts nation and state-wide have been focused on closing the gap between the opportunities available to different groups of students. The “income achievement gap,” in particular, results in average performing middle-income students graduating college at a rate of almost three times that of an average performing low-income student. For students in the lowest quintile of income, college tuition — on average — costs 37% of a family’s annual income, compared to only 2.5% for upper-income families. Campaigns across the country are seeking to close this gap by providing tuition-free college. Few programs, however, fully consider the reality of the obstacles faced by low-income students that prevent persistence to graduation. While the idea of “free college” equates to accessibility and attainability, often these new programs only remove obstacles for students, or the families of students, who are already highly likely to obtain a college degree. This note argues that many “free college” laws, as they are being put forward, effectively widen the achievement gap by increasing educational opportunities for middle-income students without removing additional barriers for low-income students. This further complicates the already complex financial aid process and fails to support the most vulnerable student populations. Informed by legal, economic, and student engagement experience, this note explores the statutory and regulatory framework for the current educational and financial aid system in New York State. It offers a critique on how the laws are thwarting the goals they originally sought to accomplish, acknowledges what the laws have gotten right, and outlines recommendations for consideration, most applicable for New York State, but relevant to other jurisdictions as they consider new laws to finance higher education.

New Report: “Restoring the American Dream: What Would It Take to Dramatically Increase Mobility from Poverty?”

mobilityfrompoverty18-001New Report: David Ellwood & Nisha G. Patel, Restoring the American Dream: What Would It Take to Dramatically Increase Mobility from Poverty? (US Partnership on Mobility from Poverty, Jan. 2018).

New Article: “City on a Hill: The Democratic Promise of Higher Education”

New Article: Rachel Moran, City on a Hill: The Democratic Promise of Higher Education, 7 U.C. Irvine L. Rev. 73 (2017).

News Coverage: “Groundbreaking empirical research shows where innovation really comes from: Breaking down barriers for underrepresented kids could quadruple America’s pool of inventors”

News Coverage: Matthew Yglesias, Groundbreaking empirical research shows where innovation really comes from: Breaking down barriers for underrepresented kids could quadruple America’s pool of inventors, Vox.com, Dec. 5, 2017.

The same research is also covered here: America’s Lost Einsteins.