Category Archives: Economic Mobility

News Article: “D.C. Homelessness Doubles National Average as Living Costs Soar”

News Article: Noah Weiland, “D.C. Homelessness Doubles National Average as Living Costs Soar,” N.Y. Times, Jan. 1, 2017.

News Article: “A Bigger Economic Pie, but a Smaller Slice for Half of the U.S.”

News Article: Patricia Cohen, “A Bigger Economic Pie, but a Smaller Slice for Half of the U.S.,” N.Y. Times, Dec. 6, 2016.

Article: “Section 8 Is the New N-Word: Policing Integration in the Age of Black Mobility”

Article: Norrinda Brown Hayat, “Section 8 Is the New N-Word: Policing Integration in the Age of Black Mobility,” 51 Wash. U. J. L. & Pol’y 061 (2016).

This Article addresses the concept of black mobility within the context of Section 8 housing vouchers. Hayat explores the rise of racially coded language and its impact on racially discriminatory housing measures, highlighting the intersectionality between narratives of black criminality and the implicit biases of Section 8 proponents. Hayat argues for eradication of Section 8 enforcement schemes and facially race-neutral policies to promote the elimination of hyper-segregated neighborhoods.

News Article: “Low-Income Housing Shown to Not Weigh on Nearby Property Values”

News Article: Chris Kirkham,”Low-Income Housing Shown to Not Weigh on Nearby Property Values,” Wall Street Journal, Nov. 28, 2016.

News Article: “Study: D.C. gentrification can cause pockets of poverty to grow, especially east of Anacostia River”

News Article: Paul Duggan, “Study: D.C. gentrification can cause pockets of poverty to grow, especially east of Anacostia River,” Washington Post, Nov. 23, 2016.

Report: “Income inequality in the U.S. by state, metropolitan area, and county”

Report: Estelle Sommeiller, Mark Price & Ellis Wazeter, “Income inequality in the U.S. by state, metropolitan area, and county,” Economic Policy Institute (June 2016).

News Article: “HUD Is Essential to the Fight Against Poverty. Ben Carson Will Lobotomize It.”

News Article: Henry Grabar, “HUD Is Essential to the Fight Against Poverty. Ben Carson Will Lobotomize It.,” Slate, Nov. 23, 2016.

Article: “HMDA, Housing Segregation, and Racial Disparities in Mortgage Lending”

Article: Charles M. Lamb,”HMDA, Housing Segregation, and Racial Disparities in Mortgage Lending,” State University of New York at Buffalo (July 2015).

Housing segregation and discrimination remain tenacious problems in America. This Article first explores the passage of the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) of 1975 and its 1989 amendments in order to clarify their objectives and requirements for providing data to the public that potentially may be used to combat redlining and lending discrimination in the nation’s housing market. Given this background, this Article then relies on HMDA data to investigate the following question: Are racial minorities in America’s largest metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) more likely to receive government-insured mortgages rather than conventional mortgages if they reside in more segregated metropolitan areas?

The analysis indicates that housing segregation has a significant negative effect on African Americans’ ability to receive conventional mortgages, thereby distinguishing them from Asians, Hispanics, and whites. If African Americans are unlikely to receive conventional mortgages in more segregated areas, this suggests that in the future, highly segregated MSAs are likely to remain segregated along black-white lines and that African Americans will continue to be the mast segregated racial group in the country. Based on this analysis, the Article concludes that HMDA should be amended to require additional data from commercial banks in order to determine the extent to which lending discrimination is occurring and thus perpetuating-and possibly even increasing-housing segregation in the United States. At minimum this data should include such basic information as applicants’ total financial assets, credit scores and history, number of dependents, value of the property to be purchased, and size of down payments required Banks routinely collect this data during the mortgage application process, so it should be relatively easy to include in their lending disclosure forms.

 

Symposium: “Policing the Police and the Community”

Symposium: “Policing the Police and the Community,” at Seton Hall University (2015)
Christina Swarns, ““I Can’t Breathe”: A Century Old Call for Justice,” 46 Seton Hall L. Rev. art. 1 (2016).

Udi Ofer, “Getting It Right: Building Effective Civilian Review Boards to Oversee Police,” 46 Seton Hall L. Rev. art. 2 (2016). 

Cynthia H. Conti-Cook, Defending the Public: Police Accountability in the Courtroom, 46 Seton Hall L. Rev. art. 3 (2016).

Article: “The New Labor Law”

Article: Kate Andrias, “The New Labor Law,” 126 Yale L.J. (2016).

Labor law is failing. Disfigured by courts, attacked by employers, and rendered inapt by a global and fissured economy, many of labor law’s most ardent proponents have abandoned it altogether. And for good reason: the law that governs collective organization and bargaining among workers has little to offer those it purports to protect. Several scholars have suggested ways to breathe new life into the old regime, yet their proposals don’t solve the basic problem. Labor law developed for the New Deal does not provide solutions to today’s inequities. But all hope is not lost. From the remnants of the old regime, the potential for a new labor law is emerging.

In this Article, I describe and defend the nascent regime, which embraces a form of social bargaining long thought unattainable in the United States. The new labor law rejects the old regime’s commitment to the employer-employee dyad and to a system of private ordering. Instead, it locates decisions about basic standards of employment at the sectoral level and positions unions as political actors empowered to advance the interests of workers generally. This new labor law, though nascent and uncertain, has the potential to salvage and secure one of labor law’s most fundamental commitments — to help achieve greater equality, both economic and political — in the context of the twenty-first century economy.