Category Archives: Education

News Article: ‘An incredible impact’: Poor kids are being priced out of youth sports. Here’s one solution.

News Article: Michael S. Rosenwald, ‘An incredible impact’: Poor kids are being priced out of youth sports. Here’s one solution., Washington Post (Oct. 28, 2016).

New Report: “Law School Scholarship Policies: Engines Of Inequity”

New Report: LSSSE, Law School Scholarship Policies: Engines Of Inequity (2017).  News coverage here.

 

 

Article: Class-Based Affirmative Action, or the Lies That We Tell About the Insignificance of Race

Article: Khiara M. Bridges, Class-Based Affirmative Action, or the Lies That We Tell About the Insignificance of Race, 96 Boston L. Rev. 55 (2016).

This Article conducts a critique of class-based affirmative action, identifying and problematizing the narrative that it tells about racial progress. The Article argues that class-based affirmative action denies that race is a significant feature of American life. It denies that individuals—and groups—continue to be advantaged and disadvantaged on account of race. It denies that there is such a thing called race privilege that materially impacts people’s worlds. Moreover, this Article suggests that at least part of the reason why class-based affirmative action has been embraced by those who oppose race-based affirmative action is precisely because it denies that race matters, has mattered, and probably will continue to matter unless we make conscious efforts to make race matter less.

The Article proceeds in two Parts. Part I locates class-based affirmative action doctrinally. Specifically, this Part identifies class-based affirmative action as the heir of the “suspect class” to “suspect classification” shift—a shift that tells its own lie about race. The substance of this lie is that those who exist at the top of racial hierarchies are as vulnerable to denigration, stigmatization, and subordination on account of race as are those who exist at the bottom of racial hierarchies. Part II goes on to demonstrate that class-based affirmative action suffers from the same infirmities from which race-based affirmative action is charged to suffer. It argues that the reason why proponents of class-based affirmative action are sanguine about these infirmities when they are present in class-based programs, but loathe them when they are present in race-based programs, is because their opposition to race-based affirmative action is not due to these infirmities. Rather, it is due to their disdain of the work that race-based affirmative action performs. That is, race-based programs function to assert, loudly, that race still matters and does so in powerful ways. Many proponents of class-based affirmative action resist this function.

Moreover, class-based affirmative action functions to assert that we, as a society, have entered a post-racial future. That is, class-based affirmative action tells a lie about the insignificance of race. Many proponents of class-based programs likely find these programs attractive and comforting for that very reason. The importance of this Article is that it uncovers the narrative work that class-based affirmative action performs, and it argues that those who are interested in racial justice ought to resist these programs because of their dangerous discursive effects.

Op-Ed: “A Thank You Letter to Betsy DeVos From a Public School Teacher”

Op-Ed: Michelle Olson, “A Thank You Letter to Betsy DeVos From a Public School Teacher,” PopSugar.com,. Feb. 8, 2017.

News Article: Median Family Income for Harvard Undergrads Triple National Average, Study Finds

News Article: William S. Flanagan & Michael E. Xie, Median Family Income for Harvard Undergrads Triple National Average, Study Finds, Harvard Crimson (Jan. 25, 2017).

Podcast: Busted: America’s Poverty Myths

Podcast: Busted: America’s Poverty Myths, from On the Media

#1: The Poverty Tour

#2: Who Deserves to Be Poor?

#3: Rags to Riches

#4: When the Safety Net Doesn’t Catch You

#5: Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook: Poverty in American Edition

 

 

News Article: America’s Great Divergence

News Article: Alana Semeuls, America’s Great Divergence, The Atlantic (Jan. 30, 2017).

Article: More than Just the Numbers: Fisher v. Texas and the Impact of Texas’s Top Ten Percent Law

Article: Shakira D. Pleasant, More than Just the Numbers: Fisher v. Texas and the Impact of Texas’s Top Ten Percent Law, 24 Univ. Miami Bis. L. Rev. 111 (2016).

Data — actual facts — demonstrate that Texas’s Top Ten Percent Law (“TTPL”) is insufficient to achieve diversity in the state’s universities and colleges. A significant amount of TTPL students graduated from hyper-segregated schools where African-American and Latino/a students, combined, comprised 80% or more of the total school population. Also, a substantial amount of these hyper-segregated schools had an economically disadvantaged student population exceeding the state average of 60.2%. Even with these numbers, however, Caucasian students were the majority racial group admitted to the University of Texas at Austin (“UT”) via TTPL in 2012, 2013, and 2014. Thus, this essay concludes, as did the brief, that “racial isolation in schools is a perverse and insufficient means to attain diversity in higher education.”

Part one gives background about the TTPL — the underlying law at issue in Fisher v. Texas. Part two contrasts statewide enrollment data and TTPL admissions data. Part three focuses on regional TTPL data, specifically Region 4 (Houston), which produces the highest rate of students that are automatically admitted to UT. The final part analyzes the data and TTPL’s impact on UT’s holistic admissions process — the underlying issue in Fisher v. Texas. From this analysis, part four demonstrates that UT needs TTPL and its holistic process to combat racial and socio-economic isolation which precludes diversity within racial groups.

New Article: “Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility”

New Article: Raj Chetty et al., Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility, Jan. 2017.

News Article: “HUD Is Essential to the Fight Against Poverty. Ben Carson Will Lobotomize It.”

News Article: Henry Grabar, “HUD Is Essential to the Fight Against Poverty. Ben Carson Will Lobotomize It.,” Slate, Nov. 23, 2016.