Category Archives: Family

News Coverage: “Lawyers for Child Welfare and Legal Aid Under Scrutiny for Facebook Posts.”

Nikita Stewart, Lawyers for Child Welfare and Legal Aid Under Scrutiny for Facebook Posts, New York Times, August, 30, 2017. [Facebook posts pose expectation and standard of conduct questions for Legal Aid workers.]

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Op-Ed: “How U.S. News college rankings promote economic inequality on campus”

Benjamin Wermund, How U.S. News college rankings promote economic inequality on campus, Politco, September 10, 2017. [“Once ladders of social mobility, universities increasingly reinforce existing wealth, fueling a backlash that helped elect Donald Trump.”]

Op-Ed: “Poverty Matters: Five Key Takeaways from the 2016 Census Data”

John Bouman, Poverty Matters: Five Key Takeaways from the 2016 Census Data Poverty Matters: Five Key Takeaways from the 2016 Census Data, The Shriver Brief, September 13, 2017. [Slight improvements haven not translated into gains for those facing poverty.]

Op-Ed: “How the Ruling Class Remade New Orleans”

Thomas Adams, How the Ruling Class Remade New Orleans, Jacobin Magazine, August 2015. [“The language of social justice has been used to sell intensified neoliberalism in post-Katrina New Orleans.”]

Op-Ed: “Unemployment in Black and White”

The Editorial Board, Unemployment in Black and White, Washington Post, August 28, 2017. [“The hard truth is that the persistence of twice-as-high joblessness for black workers has led policy makers to accept it as normal.”]

Article: “The Desert of the Unreal: Inequality in Virtual Augmented Reality”

Mary A. Franks, The Desert of the Unreal: Inequality in Virtual Augmented Reality, SSRN Aug. 8th, 2017. Abstract below:

 

The world we all live in is structured by inequality: of gender, race, class, sexual orientation, disability, and more. The promoters of virtual and augmented reality often claim that they offer a more perfect world, one that offers more stimulation, more connection, more freedom, more equality. For such technologies to be considered truly innovative, they should in some sense move us beyond our current limitations and prejudices. But when existing inequalities are unacknowledged and unaddressed in the “real” world, they tend to be replicated and augmented in virtual realities. We make new worlds based on who we are and what we do in old ones. All of our worlds, virtual and physical, are the product of human choice and human creation. The developers of virtual and augmented reality make choices about which aspects of our lived history they want to replicate, enhance, or change. The design – and design flaws – of new virtual and augmented reality technologies reveal much about the values of their developers and their consumers, providing a unique opportunity to evaluate just how innovative new technologies are with regard to social inequality.

 

News Coverage: “‘We don’t have anything’: landlords demand rent on flooded Houston homes”

Oliver Milman,’We don’t have anything’: landlords demand rent on flooded Houston homes, The Guardian, September 4, 2017. [“Displaced families say they are struggling to pay rent on damaged dwellings, as an acute housing crisis grips south-east Texas after Hurricane Harvey”]

Op-Ed: “Bad Jobs and No Welfare Give Rise to A New Type of Charity: The Diaper Bank”

Arthur Delaney, Bad Jobs and No Welfare Give Rise to A New Type of Charity: The Diaper Bank, Huffington Post Aug. 21, 2017. [“A network of diaper banks now alleviates some of the suffering cause by the 1996 gutting of welfare”]

Op-Ed: “After-School Activities Make Educational Inequality Even Worse”

Hilary L. Friedman, After-School Activities Make Educational Inequality Even Worse, The Atlantic Nov. 13, 2013. [“How middle-class parents use soccer, ballet, and chess to solidify their children’s advantage over others.”]

Op-Ed: “Two schools in Mississippi – and a lesson in race and inequality in America.”

James Lartey, Two schools in Mississippi – and a lesson in race and inequality in America, The Guardian Aug. 27, 2017. [A telling tale of divergent experiences in Mississippi public schools.]