Category Archives: Family

New Article: Improving Outcomes in Child Poverty and Wellness in Appalachia in the “New Normal” Era: Infusing Empathy Into Law

New Article: Jill C. Engle, Improving Outcomes in Child Poverty and Wellness in Appalachia in the “New Normal” Era: Infusing Empathy Into Law, 120 W. Va. L. Rev. (2018).  The article is available for download.

 

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New Article: The Child Welfare and Education Gap

New Article: Eric Chung, The Child Welfare and Education Gap, 36 Yale L. & Pol’y Rev. 365 (2018). Abstract below:

Given the overlapping interests between child welfare and education, one might expect federal laws and policies in these two areas to work in tandem. But in the United States, they have not. With food, nutrition, and early childhood programs among the few exceptions, welfare and education laws have largely been embodied in separate statutes and administered by different agencies. Since their advent and evolution from the 1900s to the present, welfare laws have become increasingly and predominantly concerned with regulating mothers and families, while education laws have become increasingly and predominantly concerned with regulating teachers and schools. Neither area of law has prioritized children as its direct beneficiaries. This Article argues that this misdirected attention is responsible for why these two areas remain disconnected: both welfare and education laws have ignored the immediate needs of children, while focusing instead on regulating the institutions surrounding them. If children were placed at the center of public benefits, the importance of linking adequate child welfare and education systems would become more obvious, as it has been for the food, nutrition, and early childhood programs that buck this trend. After analyzing the gap between these two areas of law, this Article proposes a reconceptualization and unification of child welfare and education laws and policies to better serve socioeconomically disadvantaged children and their families.

New Article: Another Day Older and Deeper in Debt: Mitigating the Deleterious Effect of Wage Garnishments on Appalachia’s Low-Wage Workers

New Article: Faith Mullen, Another Day Older and Deeper in Debt: Mitigating the Deleterious Effect of Wage Garnishments on Appalachia’s Low-Wage Workers, 120 W. Va. L. Rev. (2018).  The article is available for download.

 

New Blog Post: Segregated in the Heartland

New Blog Post: Daniel C. Vock, J. Brian Charles, & Mike Maciag, Segregated in the Heartland, Governing (Jan. 23, 2019).

Governing produced a series of articles on segregation in heartland USA.  Articles include:

Houses Divided: How States and Cities Reinforce Segregation in America

Still Separate After All These Years: How Schools Fuel White Flight

Broken Homes: How Housing Policies Keep White Neighborhoods So White (and Black Neighborhoods So Black)

Black, White & Blue: How Police and Anti-Crime Measures Reinforce Segregation

 

 

New Blog Post: Where Government Is a Dirty Word, but Its Checks Pay the Bills

Government transfer payments as a share of total personal income.government transfer payments over time.png

1970 – 1985 – 2000 – 2016

Color Scale: No data – 3% – 15% – 22% – 28% – 36% – 61%

New Blog Post: Eduardo Porter, Where Government Is a Dirty Word, but Its Checks Pay the Bills, NYTimes.com, Dec. 21, 2018.

Federal assistance has grown all over the U.S., but particularly in Appalachia and the South, where many people now get more than a third of their income from the government.

News Coverage of Poverty: Shutdown Leaves Food, Medicine and Pay in Doubt in Indian Country

isfoodstillarrivingNews Coverage of Poverty: Bruce Smith & Julie Turkewitz, Shutdown Leaves Food, Medicine and Pay in Doubt in Indian Country, NYTimes.com, Jan. 1, 2019.

 

The Chippewa Indian food distribution site in Sault Ste. Marie. Tribal leaders expressed uncertainty this week about whether deliveries of fresh food would continue arriving.

News Coverage of Poverty: The Shutdown’s Next Victims Are America’s Poorest Families

News Coverage of Poverty: Peter Wade, The Shutdown’s Next Victims Are America’s Poorest Families, RollingStone, Jan. 6, 2019.

Food stamps, housing assistance, and tax refunds are all at risk.

New Blog Post: America’s Hottest Housing Debate is Coming to Oregon

New Blog Post: Henry Grabar, America’s Hottest Housing Debate is Coming to Oregon, SLATE, Dec. 14, 2018.

New Blog Post: How Cities Make Money by Fining the Poor

BillsPilingUp.jpgNew Blog Post: Matthew Shaer, How Cities Make Money by Fining the Poor, NYTimes.com, Jan. 8, 2019.

 

 

In many parts of America, like Corinth, Mississippi, judges are locking up defendants who can’t pay — sometimes for months at a time.

Jamie Tillman in Corinth, Miss. “I thought, Because we’re poor, because we’re of a lower class, we aren’t allowed real freedom.”

New Blog Post: The hypocrisy of Trump’s immigration agenda is getting harder to ignore

New Blog Post: