Category Archives: Food

New Blog Post: Eleventh Circuit Rules that the First Amendment Protects the “Expressive Conduct” of Fort Lauderdale Food Not Bombs

New Blog Post: Marc-Tizoc Gonzalez, Eleventh Circuit Rules that the First Amendment Protects the “Expressive Conduct” of Fort Lauderdale Food Not Bombs­—Part I of II, FoodSharingLaw.net (Sept. 5, 2018).

Advertisements

Useful interactive tool: Work Requirements Tracker

Useful interactive tool: Work Requirements Tracker from the Urban Institute.

Infographic: How the Other Half Eats

Infographic: Ariel Aberg-Riger, How the Other Half Eats, Citylab, July 31, 2018 [Could be shared in class and includes good links at the end.]

ICYMI (In Case You Missed It): 7 posts you should have seen this week but probably didn’t

In a week dominated by tragedy in Greece, Michael Cohen, and the aversion of trade war with Europe, there’s a lot that got swept under the rug. ICYMI:

(1) Tamar Haspel, The true connection between poverty and obesity isn’t probably what you think, Wash. Post, July 20, 2018.

(2) Myrna Pérez, How the Midterm Elections May Be Compromised, NYTimes.com, July  19, 2018.

(3) Charlotte Graham-McLay, New Zealand Grants Domestic Violence Victims Paid Leave, NYTimes.com, July 26, 2018. In a shocking reminder of what is possible when individuals in crisis are treated humanely and afforded a small measure of decency…

(4) Dylan L. Scott, Why Trump’s attacks on preexisting conditions are an attack on women, Vox.com, July 26, 2018. women_afford_care

 

 

 

 

 

(5) Dara Lind, Americans are stepping up to show reunited migrant families there’s more to their country than Trump, Vox.com, July 26, 2018. An informal welcoming committee is offering support — with everything from plane tickets to birthday cupcakes.

(6) Julia Carrie Wong, A year after Charlottesville, why can’t big tech delete white supremacists, TheGuardian.com, July 25, 2018.

(7) Tal Kopan & Nick Valencia, Exclusive: Listen to separated moms beg for their kids in court, CNN.com, July 24, 2018.

Newsflash: The War on Poverty is Not Won — Recent commentary on how far we still have to go in the fight against poverty

file-20180327-109182-tsv16u

When hunger is increasing in many urban areas and when poverty is increasingly concentrated post Recession, is the War on Poverty won? When women and children, particularly people of color, endure poverty at disproportionate and growing rates, that statement is just a cruel assertion from the Trump administration, aimed at making it easier to slap work requirements on the poor.

News Coverage: Alfred Lubrano, Is the War on Poverty ‘a success’ as the Trump administration proclaims? Philly.com, July 27, 2018.

News Coverage: Kriston Capps, The ‘War on Poverty’ Isn’t Over, and Kids are Losing, CityLab.com, July 18, 2018.

News Coverage: Robert L. Fischer, Why the War on Poverty Isn’t Over, in 4 Charts, TheConversation.com, July 20, 2018.

Op-Ed: Renée Loth, Trump declares victory in the war on poverty to punish the poor, BostonGlobe.com, July 20, 2018.

Op-Ed: Gregory Acs, Have we won the War on Poverty? Not yet, The Urban Institute, July 26, 2018.

Op-Ed: Will Bunch, No, Trump administration, we didn’t ‘win’ the War on Poverty, Philly.com, July 19, 2018.

 

New Article: Homeless, Hungry, and Targeted: A Look at the Validity of Food-Sharing Restrictions in the United States

New Article: Samantha Holloway, Homeless, Hungry, and Targeted: A Look at the Validity of Food-Sharing Restrictions in the United States, Hofstra L. Rev. Vol. 46, 2017.

New Blog Post: Food stamp mispayments are way up this year. It has nothing to do with fraud.

New blog post: Caitlin Dewey, Food stamp mispayments are way up this year. It has nothing to do with fraud, Wash. Post, July 5, 2018.

foodstamperrorrate

New Op-Ed: Chocolate is a luxury. The people who produce it live in extreme poverty

cocoa_opedNew Op-Ed: Hans Theyer, Chocolate is a luxury. The people who produce it live in extreme poverty, Wash. Post, July 7, 2018.

New Op-Ed: How America Treats Its Own Children

New Op-Ed: Annie Lowrey, How America Treats Its Own Children, The Atlantic, June 21, 2018.

New Article: Fear and the Safety Net: Evidence from Secure Communities

New Article: Marcella Alsan and Crystal Yang, Fear and the Safety Net: Evidence from Secure Communities, SSRN (2018). Abstract below:

We study the impact of deportation fear on the incomplete take-up of federal safety net programs in the United States. We exploit changes in deportation fear due to the roll-out and intensity of Secure Communities (SC), an immigration enforcement program administered by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency (ICE) from 2008 to 2014. The SC program empowers the federal government to check the immigration status of anyone arrested by local law enforcement agencies and has led to the issuance of over two million detainers and the forcible removal of approximately 380,000 immigrants. We estimate the spillover effects of SC on Hispanic citizens, finding significant declines in ACA sign-ups and food stamp take-up, particularly among mixed-status households and areas where deportation fear is highest. In contrast, we find little response to SC among Hispanic households residing in sanctuary cities. Our results are most consistent with network effects that perpetuate fear rather than lack of benefit information or stigma.