Category Archives: housing

New Report: “Here We Go Again: Communities of Color, the Foreclosure Crisis, and Loan Servicing Failures”

New Report: MFY Legal Services & the ACLU, Here We Go Again: Communities of Color, the Foreclosure Crisis, and Loan Servicing Failures (2015).

News Article: Rural America’s Silent Housing Crisis – The Atlantic

Rural America’s Silent Housing Crisis – The Atlantic.

New Report: “When Discretion Means Denial: A National Perspective on Criminal Records Barriers to Federally Subsidized Housing”

New Report: Marie Claire Tran-Leung, When Discretion Means Denial: A National Perspective on Criminal Records Barriers to Federally Subsidized Housing (Shriver Center 2015).

News Article: Is Ending Segregation the Key to Ending Poverty? – The Atlantic

Is Ending Segregation the Key to Ending Poverty? – The Atlantic.

News Article: “The American Dream shatters in Prince George’s County” – The Washington Post

The American Dream shatters in Prince George’s County | The Washington Post.

New Report: “The Making of Ferguson: Public Policies at the Root of its Troubles”

New Report: Richard Rothstein, The Making of Ferguson: Public Policies at the Root of its Troubles (Economic Policy Institute 2014).

Program shields landlords willing to rent to the homeless | Local News | The Seattle Times

Program shields landlords willing to rent to the homeless | Local News | The Seattle Times.

News Article: Domestic Violence Drives Up New York Shelter Population as Housing Options Are Scarce – NYTimes.com

Domestic Violence Drives Up New York Shelter Population as Housing Options Are Scarce – NYTimes.com.

New-ish Article: “Addressing the Foreclosure Crisis Through Law School Clinics”

New Article: Nathalie Martin & Max Weinstein, Addressing the Foreclosure Crisis Through Law School Clinics, 20 Geo. J. Poverty Law & Pol’y 531 (2013).  Abstract below:

Since the 2008 financial crisis, unprecedented numbers of homes have been lost to foreclosure in the United States, all while public funds for free or reduced fee legal representation in some communities have all but disappeared. This means that most homeowners in foreclosure are unable to find lawyers to represent them. At the same time, clinical legal education, especially in subjects related to business and commercial law, is on the rise. This convergence offers a unique opportunity for law school clinics to give students valuable training in both litigation and financial law and also help fill the deep need for legal representation by homeowners in foreclosure. Each of us has experience representing homeowners in foreclosure, Max at Harvard Law School in the Predatory Lending and Consumer Protection Clinic, and Nathalie in the University of New Mexico School of Law’s Business and Tax Clinic.

In this Article, we discuss our experiences and offer advice and insights for clinics considering taking cases of this kind. Part I provides a very brief overview of the conditions that led to the financial crisis, a description of the extent of the problem, and a few ways clinical law programs can help. Part II discusses the practical and philosophical reasons why law school clinics play such a pivotal role in stemming the effects of the crisis on homeowners, through examples of cases litigated in Max’s clinic. Part Ill attempts to give readers a few of the basic tools they need to add this practice to their clinics for the benefit of individual homeowners and their communities.

New Article: “The New Exclusionary Zoning”

New Article: John Mangin, The New Exclusionary Zoning, 25 Stan.L.& Pol’y Rev. 91 (2014).  Abstract below:

If low-income families can’t afford the suburbs and the cities, where should they go? For the first time in American history, it makes sense to talk about whole regions of the country “gentrifying”—whole metropolitan areas whose high housing costs have rendered them inhospitable to low-income families, who, along with solidly middle class families, also feeling the crunch, have been paying higher housing costs or migrating to low-housing cost (and low-wage) areas like Texas, Arizona, or North Carolina. Underlying both of these phenomena—high housing costs in the suburbs and high housing costs in the cities—is a relatively straightforward problem of supply and demand. A city’s ability to remain affordable depends most crucially on its ability to expand housing supply in the face of increased demand. Among the people who care most about high housing costs there is a lack of understanding of the main causes and the policy approaches that can address them. The central message of this Article is that the housing advocacy community—from the shoe-leather organizer to the academic theoretician—needs to abandon its reflexively anti-development sentiments and embrace an agenda that accepts and advocates for increased housing development of all types as a way to blunt rising housing costs in the country’s most expensive markets.