Category Archives: housing

New Op-Ed: In Los Angeles, Where the Rich and the Destitute Cross Paths

New Op-Ed: Tim Arango, In Los Angeles, Where the Rich and the Destitute Cross Paths, NYTimes.com, July 2, 2018.

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New Op-Ed: Bussed Out: How America moves its homeless

New Op-Ed: Outside in America team, Bussed Out: How America moves its homeless, TheGuardian.com, Dec. 20, 2017.

New Report: Out of Reach: The High Cost of Housing

NLIHC

New Report: National Low Income Housing Coalition, Out of Reach: The High Cost of Housing, 2018.

This is the newest annual edition of NLIHC’s report, a vital piece advancing understanding of the affordable housing crisis across the nation.

 

New Op-Ed: Life Inside D.C.’s Motel Homeless Shelters

DC homelessness motels

New Op-Ed: Morgan Baskin, Life Inside D.C.’s Motel Homeless Shelters, Wash. City Paper, June 28, 2018.

New Article: Shifting the Scope: How Taking School Demographics Into Account in College Admissions Could Reduce K-12 Segregation Nationwide

New Article: Thomas Scott-Railton, Note, Shifting the Scope: How Taking School Demographics Into Account in College Admissions Could Reduce K-12 Segregation Nationwide, 36 Yale L. & Pol’y Rev. 219 (2017). Abstract below:

Deepening racial and socioeconomic segregation is producing unequal educational outcomes at the K-12 level, outcomes that are then reproduced in higher education. This is particularly true as rising competition among colleges has led many of them to focus increasingly on measures of merit that correlate with income and as parents and students adjust their behavior in light of those metrics. While existing affirmative action programs at colleges provide some counterweight to this dynamic, they are limited by institutional (and constitutional) constraints. Out of concern for revenue and rankings, many colleges are constrained in the number of students from low-income backgrounds they are willing to admit. Such a limited scope is not inevitable, however.

If colleges were to give a substantial admissions bonus to applicants who had attended K-12 schools with at least a certain percentage of low-income students, higher education could become a force for countering inequality at the K-12 level, instead of reproducing it. College admissions policies serve as a crucial reference point for parents, students, and educators on down through K-12. By rewarding applicants for attending socioeconomically integrated schools, colleges would mobilize the resources of private actors across the country towards integration. The benefits of this would be significant, especially for students from low-income families who would have an increased chance of attending integrated K-12 schools as a result. Such a policy would also help colleges better foster diversity on campuses, as more students would have had prior experience in integrated settings.

This Note explores the ongoing problem of K-12 re-segregation, argues that by adopting this policy colleges could work to promote integration, examines how such a policy could best be designed to do so, and addresses why such a policy would be constitutional. At a time when educational inequality is on the rise, there is an urgent need for new affirmative action proposals that can combat segregation and do so within colleges’ existing constitutional and institutional constraints. The policy proposal advocated in this Note would do both, interrupting key elements of the present vicious circle.

New Op-Ed: The situation on the streets

SF homelessness

New Op-Ed: Kevin Fagan, The situation on the streets, San Francisco Chronicle, June 28, 2018.

New Article: The Rise and Fall of New York Public Housing: An Oral History

NY public housingNew Article: Luis Ferré-Sadurní, The Rise and Fall of New York Public Housing: An Oral History, NYtimes.com, June 26, 2018.

New Op-Ed: The Deep, Uniquely American Roots of Our Affordable-Housing Crisis

New Op-Ed: Bryce Covert, The Deep, Uniquely American Roots of Our Affordable-Housing Crisis, The Nation, May 24, 2018.

New Op-Ed: This is what homelessness looks like for my mom

carliving_imageNew Op-Ed: Melody Clark, This is what homelessness looks like for my mom, Curbed Seattle, April 17, 2018.

Thousands of people are experiencing housing instability in Seattle — including those staying on couches and in cars.

News Coverage: New York City Guarantees a Lawyer to Every Resident Facing Eviction

News Coverage: Kriston Capps, New York City Guarantees a Lawyer to Every Resident Facing Eviction, CityLab, August 14, 2017.