Category Archives: Latinos

ICYMI (In Case You Missed It): 7 posts you should have seen this week but probably didn’t

In a week dominated by tragedy in Greece, Michael Cohen, and the aversion of trade war with Europe, there’s a lot that got swept under the rug. ICYMI:

(1) Tamar Haspel, The true connection between poverty and obesity isn’t probably what you think, Wash. Post, July 20, 2018.

(2) Myrna Pérez, How the Midterm Elections May Be Compromised, NYTimes.com, July  19, 2018.

(3) Charlotte Graham-McLay, New Zealand Grants Domestic Violence Victims Paid Leave, NYTimes.com, July 26, 2018. In a shocking reminder of what is possible when individuals in crisis are treated humanely and afforded a small measure of decency…

(4) Dylan L. Scott, Why Trump’s attacks on preexisting conditions are an attack on women, Vox.com, July 26, 2018. women_afford_care

 

 

 

 

 

(5) Dara Lind, Americans are stepping up to show reunited migrant families there’s more to their country than Trump, Vox.com, July 26, 2018. An informal welcoming committee is offering support — with everything from plane tickets to birthday cupcakes.

(6) Julia Carrie Wong, A year after Charlottesville, why can’t big tech delete white supremacists, TheGuardian.com, July 25, 2018.

(7) Tal Kopan & Nick Valencia, Exclusive: Listen to separated moms beg for their kids in court, CNN.com, July 24, 2018.

Advertisements

New Op-Ed: What It Costs to Be Smuggled Across the U.S. Border

New Op-Ed: Nicholas Kulish, What It Costs to Be Smuggled Across the U.S. Border, NYTimes.com, June 30, 2018.

New Article: Advocacy in Ideas: Legal Education and Social Movements

New Article: Monica Bell, Tanya K. Hernandez, Solangel Maldonado, Rachelle Holmes Perkins, Chantal Thomas, Olatunde C.  Johnson, Elise Lopez, Advocacy  in Ideas: Legal Education and Social Movements, Columbia University Academic Commons, 2018. Abstract below:

Panel moderated by Professor Olatunde Johnson, featuring Professors Monica Bell, Tanya K. Hernández, Solangel Maldonado, and Chantal Thomas. Introduced by Elise Lopez. This panel is really an opportunity to explore the role of women of color in shaping ideas in the legal academy and in legal discourse more broadly. Everyone on this panel today is a professor and has joined legal academia, but what I think we really want to emphasize through this is that for many of us it begins in law school, where you can engage in shaping ideas through the writing that you do in your courses and in journals, in taking leadership positions in journals, and in organizing conferences like this.

New Op-Ed: How Scapegoating Immigrants Hurts All Workers

New Op-Ed: George Goehl, How Scapegoating Immigrants Hurts All Workers, The Nation, June 19, 2018.

“When people are so dehumanized that forcing kids to sleep in kennels becomes acceptable, the value of life for everyone goes down.”

Immigrant Family Separation Collection: news coverage, volunteer/giving links, and responses to conservative disinformation

MoralsIf you follow my twitter feed (@EzraRosser) you know the family separation at the border really bothers me (it may be connected to the fact that my wife and children are Salvadorans, but I think there are plenty of non-personal reasons to be upset about what we have become). I decided it would be worthwhile to do a post that collects a lot of the news coverage, volunteer/giving/protest information, and responses to the conservative disinformation that is trying to obscure just how evil the Trump administration’s family separation policy is. My op-ed from last week in The Hill is here. But there is a lot coming out about the policy, conditions, and horror so I hope this small collection effort helps people sort through everything. If you have things that would be good to add, please email me and I will add things. It is broken down into sections: A. Overview of the Policy, B. Coverage of Conditions and ICE Practice, C. Responses to Conservative Disinformation, D. Volunteer/Giving/Donation Opportunities, E. Protest Information, and F. Additional Responses.

A. Overview of the Policy

B. Coverage of Conditions and ICE Practice

Not sure how to classify this. . . justifications given by Trump administration officials:

C. Responses to Conservative Disinformation

D. Partial List of Volunteer/Giving/Donation Opportunities (Thanks to Jayesh Rathod!) (if you would like to add more, just email me).

E. Protest Information (Thanks to Jayesh Rathod!)

F. Additional Responses 

Academic:

Advocacy:

New Op-Ed: At the border, my son was taken from me

asylummotherNew Op-Ed: Mirian G., At the border, my son was taken from me, CNN, May 29, 2018.

 

New Article: Response and Recovery after Maria: Lessons for Disaster Law and Policy

New Article: Daniel A. Farber, Response and Recovery after Maria: Lessons for Disaster Law and Policy, UC Berkeley Public Law Research Paper, May 15, 2018. Abstract below:

Hurricane Maria had a devastating impact on Puerto Rico. The federal response to Maria was slow, leaving much of the population without basic necessities for extended periods. Lives were lost as a result. The federal government failed to rise to the challenges posed by logistic difficulties and strained agency resources due to preceding disasters. The response was hindered by unrealistic planning, by Puerto Rico’s lack of political power in Washington, and by presidential indifference. In the end, despite its much greater needs, Puerto Rico received assistance much more slowly than Houston. This article analyzes the reasons for the flawed response and proposes improvements in future disaster policy. Like Katrina, Maria is a story of how systems failed just when they were most needed by our most vulnerable citizens.

New Article: Fear and the Safety Net: Evidence from Secure Communities

New Article: Marcella Alsan and Crystal Yang, Fear and the Safety Net: Evidence from Secure Communities, SSRN (2018). Abstract below:

We study the impact of deportation fear on the incomplete take-up of federal safety net programs in the United States. We exploit changes in deportation fear due to the roll-out and intensity of Secure Communities (SC), an immigration enforcement program administered by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency (ICE) from 2008 to 2014. The SC program empowers the federal government to check the immigration status of anyone arrested by local law enforcement agencies and has led to the issuance of over two million detainers and the forcible removal of approximately 380,000 immigrants. We estimate the spillover effects of SC on Hispanic citizens, finding significant declines in ACA sign-ups and food stamp take-up, particularly among mixed-status households and areas where deportation fear is highest. In contrast, we find little response to SC among Hispanic households residing in sanctuary cities. Our results are most consistent with network effects that perpetuate fear rather than lack of benefit information or stigma.

This should be denounced forcefully and strongly… from the White House (not just Trump speaking, but an official policy statement): What You Need To Know About The Violent Animals Of MS-13

As someone who has a house in El Salvador, I know there are lots of issues with gangs, BUT this sort of dehumanization (which echos Trump’s earlier statement) should be denounced forcefully. Shame on all those who worked on this and all those who hesitate before resigning when asked to do similar things.

New Article: Detention, Inc.

New Article: Denise L. Gilman & Luis Romero, Detention, Inc., SSRN Mar. 2018. Abstract below:

This paper addresses the influence of economic inequality on immigration detention. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (“DHS”) detains roughly 350,000 migrants each year and maintains more than 30,000 beds each day. This massive detention system raises issues of economic power and powerlessness. This paper connects, for the first time, the influence of economic inequality on system-wide immigration detention policy as well as on individual detention decisions.

The paper begins with a description of the systemic impact that for-profit prisons have had on the federal immigration detention system, by promoting wide-scale detention. The resulting expansion of detention has led to ever-increasing profitability for the private prison sector, which allows the companies to exercise even more influence over policymakers to achieve yet higher levels of detention. The influence of wealthy private prison corporations also affects the very nature of immigration detention, leading to use of jail-like facilities that are the product offered by the private prison industry.

The paper then describes the mechanisms by which economic inequality dictates the likelihood and length of detention in individual cases. The detention or release decisions made by DHS in individual cases must account for the need to keep numerous detention beds full to satisfy the contracts made with powerful private prison companies. DHS regularly sets bond amounts at levels that are not correlated to flight risk or danger but rather to the length of time that the individual must be held in detention to keep the available space full. The article presents data, obtained from immigration authorities regarding detention and bond patterns at a specific detention center that bears out this point. The research finds an inverse relationship between the number of newly arriving immigrants in the detention center and the bond amounts set by ICE. During times when new arrivals were few, the amount required to be released from detention on bond was high; during times when there were many new arrivals, bond amounts were reduced or set at zero.

The article also presents another way in which economic inequality affects the likelihood of detention at the individual level. Release and detention are largely controlled through the use of monetary bond requirements, which must be paid in full. The regular use of financial bonds as the exclusive mechanism for release means that those migrants who are most able to pay are most likely to be released without regard to their likelihood of absconding or endangering the community. Wealth thus determines detention rather than an individualized determination of the necessity of depriving an individual of liberty.

The paper urges that the role of economic inequality in immigration detention raises troubling issues of democratic governance and the commodification of traditional governmental functions. The current system also leads to an unjustifiable redistribution of wealth from the poor to the rich.

The paper concludes with recommendations for reform. These reforms would help to sideline the influence of economic inequality in immigration detention decision-making.