Category Archives: Legal Aid

News Article: If you’re a poor person in America, Trump’s budget is not for you

News Article: Steven Mufson and Tracy Jan, If you’re a poor person in America, Trump’s budget is not for you, Washington Post (Mar. 16, 2017).

Blog Post: What happens to poor people if there is no affordable legal aid?

Blog Post: Kendra Allen, What happens to poor people if there is no affordable legal aid?, The Daily Wrag (Mar. 21, 2017).

 

 

Blog Post: Why I — and Legal Aid — Stand in Solidarity with LSC

Blog Post: Rachel Rintelmann, Why I — and Legal Aid — Stand in Solidarity with LSC, Making Justice Real blog (Mar. 17, 2017).

News Article: Too Broke To Go Bankrupt? Harvard Student Uses Software To Tackle Problem For Poor

News Article: Daniel Fisher, Too Broke To Go Bankrupt? Harvard Student Uses Software To Tackle Problem For Poor, Forbes (Mar. 2, 2017).

 

News Article: Ten Examples of Resistance to Government Raids

News Article: Bill Quigley, Ten Examples of Resistance to Government Raids, Huffington Post (Feb. 22, 2017).

News Article: UNC May Bar Centers From Legal Work

News Article:Scott Jaschik, UNC May Bar Centers From Legal Work, Inside Higher Ed (Feb. 27, 2017).

News Article: Trump’s first budget would end program to help low-income Americans get lawyers

News Article: Alan Pyke, Trump’s first budget would end program to help low-income Americans get lawyers, Think Progress (Feb. 20, 2017).

News Article: “Bringing Together Medical and Law Students to Help Disadvantaged Residents in DC”

News Article: “Bringing Together Medical and Law Students to Help Disadvantaged Residents in DC,” Georgetown University Medical Center, Nov. 22, 2016.

Article: “Rebellious Strains in Transactional Lawyering for Underserved Entrepreneurs and Community Groups”

New Article: Paul R. Tremblay, Rebellious Strains in Transactional Lawyering for Underserved Entrepreneurs and Community Groups, 23 Clinical L. Rev. (forthcoming 2016).

In his 1992 book Rebellious Lawyering: One Chicano’s Vision of Progressive Law Practice, Gerald López disrupted the conventional understandings of what it meant to be an effective poverty lawyer or public interest attorney. His critiques and prescriptions were aimed at litigators and lawyers similarly engaged in struggles for social change. His book did not address the role of progressive transactional lawyers. Today, transactional lawyers working in underserved communities are far more common. This Essay seeks to apply López’s critiques to the work of those practitioners.

I argue here that transactional legal services, or TLS, on behalf of subordinated clients achieves many of the aims of the Rebellious Lawyering project. I separate TLS on behalf of individual entrepreneurs from a more collective TLS on behalf of community or worker groups. For practitioners working with entrepreneurs, the Essay observes that client power, control, and autonomy are more readily achieved, albeit through what López might describe as quite regnant practices. Those practices, I argue, are fully justified in this context. What TLS for entrepreneurs does not accomplish, though, is community mobilization, a downside that is regrettable but not a reason to eschew that kind of work. Collective TLS provides all of the upsides of entrepreneurial TLS while not sacrificing mobilization goals. That version of TLS, though, does present two of its own challenges, one triggered by the complexity and sophistication of the legal issues involved in may community economic development projects, and the second resulting from the nature of group representation.

Jotwell Post: “How and Why Representation Matters” [Reviewing Colleen F. Shanahan, Anna E. Carpenter & Alyx Mark, Lawyers, Power, and Strategic Expertise, 93 Denv. L. Rev. 469 (forthcoming 2016)]

Jotwell Post: Jessica Steinberg, How and Why Representation Matters, Jotwell, Aug. 17, 2016 [Reviewing Colleen F. Shanahan, Anna E. Carpenter & Alyx Mark, Lawyers, Power, and Strategic Expertise, 93 Denv. L. Rev. 469 (forthcoming 2016)]