Category Archives: Race

New Book: “Poison in the Ivy: Race Relations and the Reproduction of Inequality on Elite College Campuses”

byrdComps.inddNew Book: W. Carson Byrd, Poison in the Ivy: Race Relations and the Reproduction of Inequality on Elite College Campuses (Nov. 2017). Overview below:

The world of elite campuses is one of rarified social circles, as well as prestigious educational opportunities. W. Carson Byrd studied twenty-eight of the most selective colleges and universities in the United States to see whether elite students’ social interactions with each other might influence their racial beliefs in a positive way, since many of these graduates will eventually hold leadership positions in society. He found that students at these universities believed in the success of the ‘best and the brightest,’ leading them to situate differences in race and status around issues of merit and individual effort.

Poison in the Ivy challenges popular beliefs about the importance of cross-racial interactions as an antidote to racism in the increasingly diverse United States. He shows that it is the context and framing of such interactions on college campuses that plays an important role in shaping students’ beliefs about race and inequality in everyday life for the future political and professional leaders of the nation. Poison in the Ivy is an eye-opening look at race on elite college campuses, and offers lessons for anyone involved in modern American higher education.

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Op-Ed: “Minority Neighborhoods Pay Higher Car Insurance Premiums Than White Areas With the Same Risk”

Julia Angwin, Jeff Larson, Lauren Kirchner and Surya Mattu, Minority Neighborhoods Pay Higher Car Insurance Premiums Than White Areas With the Same Risk, ProPublica, April 5, 2017. [“…some major insurers charge minority neighborhoods as much as 30 percent more than other areas with similar accident costs.”]

Op-Ed: “The Safety Net is Crucial for Kids”

Chad Stone, The Safety Net is Crucial for Kids, U.S. News, October 13, 2017. [“Government programs like tax credits and SNAP are proven to lower childhood poverty rates.”]

Op-Ed: “Trump officials allow Puerto Ricans to use food stamps for hot food”

Nathaniel Weixel, Trump officials allow Puerto Ricans to use food stamps for hot food, The Hill, October 3, 2017. [“The Trump administration has granted a waiver so that Puerto Ricans can use food stamp benefits to purchase prepared food in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.”]

New Article: “Limiting the Collective Right to Exclude”

Boyack, Andrea J., Limiting the Collective Right to Exclude (May 24, 2017). Fordham Urban Law Journal, Vol. 44, 2017. [Abstract below]

For decades, society’s disparate interests and priorities have stymied attempts to resolve issues of housing affordability and equity. Zoning law and servitude law, both of which have been robustly empowered by decades of jurisprudence, effectively grant communities the legal right and ability to exclude various sorts of residences from their wealthiest neighborhoods. Exclusion by housing type results in exclusion of categories of people, namely, renters, the relatively poor, and racial minorities. Although our society’s housing woes may indeed be intractable if we continue to treat a group’s right to exclude with the level of deference that such exclusionary efforts currently enjoy, this treatment is unjustifiable. Courts should acknowledge and consider the broad public and private costs that are created by a group’s unfettered right to exclude. A more balanced approach would weigh individual autonomy to control property and various public harms resulting from community exclusions against legitimate community needs to exclude certain residents and uses. Judicial limits of the collective right to exclude may enable real progress toward fair and affordable housing to be achieved at last.

Op-Ed: “African Americans are the only racial group in U.S. still making less than they did in 2000”

Heather Long, African Americans are the only racial group in U.S. still making less than they did in 2000, Washington Post, September 15, 2017. [“African Americans were worse off financially in 2016 than they were in 2000”]

Op-Ed: “Waiting for a Perfect Protest?”

Michael McBride, Traci Blackmon, Frank Reid, Barbara Skinner, Waiting for a Perfect Protest?, New York Times, September 1, 2017. [Is peaceful protest a legitimate response to unrest in the face of media invalidation?]

New Article: “The Power of the Public Defender Experience: Learning by Fighting for the Incarcerated and Poor”

Patrick C. Brayer, The Power of the Public Defender Experience: Learning by Fighting for the Incarcerated and Poor, 53 Wash. U. J. L. & Pol’y 105 (2017). Abstract below:

This Essay discusses how public defender apprenticeships impact law students and help mold their future careers. Brayer discusses the tangible advantages that the apprenticeship imparts on students as well as the transferable skills that students gain. Brayer then analyzes the internal and professional growth of students that participate in this apprenticeship. Brayer situates this growth within the context of Chief Justice John Marshall’s own similar experience, arguing how the public defender experience focuses and matures aspiring lawyers.

Op-Ed: “Making America White Again”

Toni Morrison, Making America White Again, The New Yorker, November 21, 2106. [“The choices made by white men, who are prepared to abandon their humanity out of fear of black men and women, suggest the true horror of lost status.”]

Op-Ed: “Poverty Matters: Five Key Takeaways from the 2016 Census Data”

John Bouman, Poverty Matters: Five Key Takeaways from the 2016 Census Data Poverty Matters: Five Key Takeaways from the 2016 Census Data, The Shriver Brief, September 13, 2017. [Slight improvements haven not translated into gains for those facing poverty.]