Category Archives: Race

New Report: “Ban the Box and Racial Discrimination: A Review of the Evidence and Policy Recommendations”

New Report: Christina Plerhoples & Stacy Mychal Cohen, Ban the Box and Racial Discrimination: A Review of the Evidence and Policy Recommendations (Urban Institute 2017).

New Article: “Rendered Invisible: African American Low-Wage Workers and the Workplace Exploitation Paradigm”

New Article: Llezlie Green Coleman, Rendered Invisible: African American Low-Wage Workers and the Workplace Exploitation Paradigm, 60 Howard L.J. 61 (2016). Abstract below:

The narrative of low-wage worker exploitation has increasingly narrowed in focus to reflect the experiences of undocumented immigrant workers whose immigration status makes them particularly vulnerable to wage theft and other denials of their substantive workplace rights. Indeed, much of the scholarship in this area rests solidly at the intersection of immigrant justice and employment law. This article disrupts this paradigm by arguing that this limited narrative has rendered African American low-wage workers invisible. It also draws from the voices of low-wage worker advocates who have borrowed from current activism to announce that #BlackWorkersMatter. Given the role of paradigms in defining which issues merit our attention, analysis, and assessment, this article argues for a shift in the scholarly conversation to consider not only the historical reasons for the distancing of African Americans from worker advocacy, but also the current dynamics that have facilitated this phenomenon. This article draws from critical race theorists’ black/white binary analysis to consider whether there exists an immigrant/non-immigrant binary paradigm in the analyses of low-wage worker exploitation. Finally, it considers the particular vulnerabilities and disadvantages this paradigm creates for African American workers.

Not strictly about poverty but worth watching / reading: Daily Show and Guardian Op-Ed on Philando Castile

And from a friend, this op-ed: Chiraag Bains, “We must remain shocked over Philando Castile. Justice needs moral outrage,” The Guardian, June 21, 2017.

Report: “The Status of Black Women in The United States”

Report: “The Status of Black Women in The United States“, National Domestic Workers Alliance (2017).

Paper: “Racism in the Credit Card Industry”

Andrea Freeman, Racism in the Credit Card Industry, 95 N.C. L. Rev. 1071 (2017).

News Article: “States with Large Black Populations are Stingier with Government Benefits”

Alana Samuels, “States with Large Black Populations are Stingier with Government Benefits“, The Atlantic, June 6, 2017.

New Book: “White Working Class: Overcoming Class Cluelessness in America”

WWC BookNew Book: Joan C. Williams, White Working Class: Overcoming Class Cluelessness in America (2017).

Opinion: “How Policing Black Boys Leads To The Conditioning Of Black Men”

Kristen Henning and Angela J. Davis, “How Policing Black Boys Leads To The Conditioning Of Black Men“, NPR Code Switch, May 23, 2017.

New Article: “Racism in the Credit Card Industry”

New Article: Andrea Freeman, Racism in the Credit Card Industry, 95 North Carolina L. Rev. 1071 (2017).  Abstract below:

In a social and financial climate characterized by deep racial and socioeconomic divide, racism against credit card applicants and consumers is a core piece of the systemic inequality that perpetuates dramatic disparities in wealth, employment, health, and education. Over several decades, credit cards have evolved into an essential tool for lower- and middle-class families to maintain financial stability through strategic balancing between debt and disposable income. Now, without a credit card, many households cannot manage to meet the basic needs of their families. Credit card companies take advantage of this reality, imposing exploitative fees, interest rates, and other conditions on consumers who have no choice but to use the companies’ products. Even worse, the companies do so in a racially discriminatory way, burdening Black and Latino customers with the worst credit card terms, often unrelated to credit risk. This type of consumer racism dates back to the Reconstruction era and reflects an unbroken chain of laws and policies cementing racial economic inequality. Social norms and stereotypes make the resulting inequality appear cultural and personal instead of systemic and structural.

This Article is the first to apply a critical race theory analysis to the problem of racism against credit card consumers. After describing the role that history and stereotyping play in allowing credit card corporations to discriminate against consumers, it identifies fatal flaws in the two laws designed to address racial discrimination and inequality in credit, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and the Community Reinvestment Act. It then proposes amendments to the Consumer Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act based on rehabilitative reparations theory and slavery disclosure laws that would require credit card companies to make significant investments into the communities they harm.

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New Book: “The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America”

New Book: Richard Rothstein, “The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America” (2017).