Category Archives: Race

News Article: Trump Budget Proposal Reflects Working-Class Resentment of the Poor

News Article: Eduardo Porter, Trump Budget Proposal Reflects Working-Class Resentment of the Poor, N.Y. Times (Mar. 7, 2017).

Article: Between Indigence, Islamophobia, and Erasure: Poor and Muslim in “War on Terror” America

Article: Khaled H. Beydoun, Between Indigence, Islamophobia, and Erasure: Poor and Muslim in “War on Terror” America, 104 Cal. L. Rev. 1463 (2016).

Nearly half of the Muslim American population is interlocked between indigence and “Islamophobia,” or anti-Muslim animus. Of the estimated eight million Muslim Americans, 45 percent of this population earns a household income less than $30,000 per year. While this statistic clashes with pervasive stereotyping of Muslim Americans as middle class, economically upwardly mobile, or opulently wealthy, it does correspond with the legal poverty line in the United States.

Since the September 11th terrorist attacks (9/11), the legal literature analyzing national security, anti-terror policies, and Muslim American civil liberties has been prolific. The emergence of “counterradicalization” policing within Muslim American communities drives this scholarly interest forward. However, since 9/11, Muslim Americans have been framed as similarly situated victims within legal literature. As a result, this body of scholarship fails to closely examine vulnerable indigent and working-class spaces where public and private Islamophobia is disproportionately unleashed. This failure compounds the injuries Muslim Americans already suffer.

This Essay intervenes to examine these liminal and overlooked spaces where indigence and Islamophobia collide. In turn, it highlights how the convergence of poverty, religious profiling and prosecution, and mounting counter radicalization policing disparately impact Muslim America’s most vulnerable demographic amid the still-escalating War on Terror.

News Article: Ten Examples of Resistance to Government Raids

News Article: Bill Quigley, Ten Examples of Resistance to Government Raids, Huffington Post (Feb. 22, 2017).

News Article: The biggest beneficiaries of the government safety net: Working-class whites

News Article: Tracy Jan, The biggest beneficiaries of the government safety net: Working-class whites, Washington Post (Feb. 16, 2017).

Series: The New Face of American Unemployment

Series: Jeanna Smialek and Patricia Laya, The New Face of American Unemployment, Bloomberg (2017).

News Article: Federal Anti-Poverty Programs Primarily Help the GOP’s Base

News Article: Ronald Brownstein, Federal Anti-Poverty Programs Primarily Help the GOP’s Base, The Atlantic (Feb. 16, 2017).

 

Report: Food Stamp Work Requirements and the Implications of Devolution

Report: Jane Collins, Food Stamp Work Requirements and the Implications of Devolution, The Gender Policy Report.

News Article: Hard Lessons From Chicago’s Public Housing Reform

News Article: Susan J. Popkin, Hard Lessons From Chicago’s Public Housing Reform, CityLab (Feb. 7, 2017).

Article: Class-Based Affirmative Action, or the Lies That We Tell About the Insignificance of Race

Article: Khiara M. Bridges, Class-Based Affirmative Action, or the Lies That We Tell About the Insignificance of Race, 96 Boston L. Rev. 55 (2016).

This Article conducts a critique of class-based affirmative action, identifying and problematizing the narrative that it tells about racial progress. The Article argues that class-based affirmative action denies that race is a significant feature of American life. It denies that individuals—and groups—continue to be advantaged and disadvantaged on account of race. It denies that there is such a thing called race privilege that materially impacts people’s worlds. Moreover, this Article suggests that at least part of the reason why class-based affirmative action has been embraced by those who oppose race-based affirmative action is precisely because it denies that race matters, has mattered, and probably will continue to matter unless we make conscious efforts to make race matter less.

The Article proceeds in two Parts. Part I locates class-based affirmative action doctrinally. Specifically, this Part identifies class-based affirmative action as the heir of the “suspect class” to “suspect classification” shift—a shift that tells its own lie about race. The substance of this lie is that those who exist at the top of racial hierarchies are as vulnerable to denigration, stigmatization, and subordination on account of race as are those who exist at the bottom of racial hierarchies. Part II goes on to demonstrate that class-based affirmative action suffers from the same infirmities from which race-based affirmative action is charged to suffer. It argues that the reason why proponents of class-based affirmative action are sanguine about these infirmities when they are present in class-based programs, but loathe them when they are present in race-based programs, is because their opposition to race-based affirmative action is not due to these infirmities. Rather, it is due to their disdain of the work that race-based affirmative action performs. That is, race-based programs function to assert, loudly, that race still matters and does so in powerful ways. Many proponents of class-based affirmative action resist this function.

Moreover, class-based affirmative action functions to assert that we, as a society, have entered a post-racial future. That is, class-based affirmative action tells a lie about the insignificance of race. Many proponents of class-based programs likely find these programs attractive and comforting for that very reason. The importance of this Article is that it uncovers the narrative work that class-based affirmative action performs, and it argues that those who are interested in racial justice ought to resist these programs because of their dangerous discursive effects.

News Article: Median Family Income for Harvard Undergrads Triple National Average, Study Finds

News Article: William S. Flanagan & Michael E. Xie, Median Family Income for Harvard Undergrads Triple National Average, Study Finds, Harvard Crimson (Jan. 25, 2017).