Category Archives: Reports

New Report: “Here We Go Again: Communities of Color, the Foreclosure Crisis, and Loan Servicing Failures”

New Report: MFY Legal Services & the ACLU, Here We Go Again: Communities of Color, the Foreclosure Crisis, and Loan Servicing Failures (2015).

New Report: “California’s New Vagrancy Laws: The Growing Enactment and Enforcement of Anti-Homeless Laws in the Golden State”

Berkley ReportNew Report: Marina Fisher, Nathaniel Miller, Lindsay Walter &Jeffrey Selbin, California’s New Vagrancy Laws: The Growing Enactment and Enforcement of Anti-Homeless Laws in the Golden State (2015).  Abstract below:

Vagrancy laws conjure up a distant past when authorities punished people without a home or permanent residence. Whether the objects of pity or scorn, vagrants could be cited or jailed under laws selectively enforced against anyone deemed undesirable. Although such laws have generally been struck down by courts as unconstitutionally vague, today’s “vagrants” are homeless people, who face growing harassment and punishment for their presence in public.

More than one in five homeless people in the country lives in California, and two-thirds are unsheltered. The state legislature has done little to respond to this widespread problem, forcing municipal governments to address homelessness with local laws and resources. Cities have responded by enacting and enforcing new vagrancy laws — a wide range of municipal codes that target or disproportionately impact homeless people.

Through extensive archival research and case studies of several cities, the report presents detailed evidence of the growing enactment and enforcement of municipal anti-homeless laws in recent decades as cities engage in a race to the bottom to push out homeless people. It concludes with a call for a state-level solution to end the expensive and inhumane treatment of some of California’s most vulnerable residents.

New Report: “When Discretion Means Denial: A National Perspective on Criminal Records Barriers to Federally Subsidized Housing”

New Report: Marie Claire Tran-Leung, When Discretion Means Denial: A National Perspective on Criminal Records Barriers to Federally Subsidized Housing (Shriver Center 2015).

New Report from the CBO: “Temporary Assistance for Needy Families: Spending and Policy Options”

New Report: Congressional Budget Office, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families: Spending and Policy Options (2015).

New Report (from the White House): “2014 Native Youth Report”

DSC_0351New Report (from the White House): “2014 Native Youth Report” (2014).  [Largely about socioeconomic issues and educational problems.]

New Report: “The Making of Ferguson: Public Policies at the Root of its Troubles”

New Report: Richard Rothstein, The Making of Ferguson: Public Policies at the Root of its Troubles (Economic Policy Institute 2014).

New Report: “Concentration of Poverty in the New Millennium: Changes in the Prevalence, Composition, and Location of High-Poverty Neighborhoods”

CoverNew Report: Paul Jargowsky, Concentration of Poverty in the New Millennium: Changes in the Prevalence, Composition, and Location of High-Poverty Neighborhoods (2013).  Abstract below:

Concentration of Poverty in the New Millennium, authored by TCF fellow and CURE director Paul A. Jargowsky, is the first to compare the 2000 census data with the 2007-11 American Community Survey (ACS), revealing the extent to which concentrated poverty has returned to, and in some ways exceeded, the previous peak level in 1990.

[NOTE: Updated figures for the 2008–2012 period are available here.]

Concentrated poverty is defined as census tracts where more than 40 percent of households live below the federal poverty threshold, currently set at approximately $23,000 per year for a family of four.

“In the USA, there are now more census tracts of concentrated poverty than have ever been recorded before, resulting in more than 11 million Americans, or 4 percent of the population, living in severely distressed neighborhoods,” said Jargowsky.

“The increase in concentrated poverty was highest in the Midwest, which experienced a 132 percent increase in the number of people living in high poverty neighborhoods, to 2.7 million; followed by the South, which suffered a 66 percent increase to 4.6 million.”

The Century Foundation/CURE report further reveals that the most significant increases in concentrated poverty occurred., not in the major cities, but rather in small to mid-sized metropolitan areas.

New Report: “State of the Nation’s Housing 2014″

son_2014_coverNew Report: Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, State of the Nation’s Housing 2014 (2014).  [Note: the link takes you to the main page and from there you can open the whole report or individual sections.]

New Report: “Poverty in the United States: 2013″

New Report: Thomas Gabe (Congressional Research Services), Poverty in the United States: 2013 (Sept. 25, 2014).

-Thanks to Susan Lewis and Billie Jo Kaufman for the heads up!

New Census Poverty and Health Coverage Statistics / Reports

This year what was a single report is broken into two reports:

CensusCarmen DeNavas-Walt and Bernadette D. Proctor, Income and Poverty in the United States: 2013 (Census Bureau 2014).

Jessica C. Smith and Carla Medalia, Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2013 (Census Bureau 2014).