Category Archives: Taxation

News Article: Who Wins and Who Loses Under Republicans’ Health Care Plan

News Article: Kevin Quealy & Margot Sanger-KatzWho Wins and Who Loses Under Republicans’ Health Care Plan, N.Y. Times (Mar. 8, 2017). [w/charts]

News Article: Don’t be fooled by ‘school choice,’ it is the latest attempt to funnel tax money to private schools

News Article: Ken Zornes, Don’t be fooled by ‘school choice,’ it is the latest attempt to funnel tax money to private schools , Dallas News (Feb. 3, 2017).

News Article: Can Miami Convince The Supreme Court That Subprime Loans Hurt Cities, Too?

News Article: Amelia Thomson-DeVeaux, Can Miami Convince The Supreme Court That Subprime Loans Hurt Cities, Too?, FiveThirtyEight (Nov. 8, 2016).

News Article: We Can Make Housing More Affordable

News Article: A. Barton Hinkle, We Can Make Housing More Affordable, Reason.com (Oct. 31, 2016).

Letter to the Editor: How to make housing more affordable

Letter to the Editor: How to make housing more affordable, Washington Post (Oct. 21, 2016).

News Article: “Portland Adopts Surcharge on C.E.O. Pay in Move vs. Income Inequality”

News Article: Gretchen Morgenson, “Portland Adopts Surcharge on C.E.O. Pay in Move vs. Income Inequality,” N.Y. Times, Dec. 7, 2016.

Article: “Families Facing Tax Increases Under Trump’s Latest Tax Plan”

Article: Lily L. Batchelder, “Families Facing Tax Increases Under Trump’s Latest Tax Plan,” NYU School of Law (Sept. 2016).

Donald Trump’s latest tax plan would cost more than $5 trillion over 10 years. Trump claims his plan would cut taxes for every income group, with the largest tax cuts for working- and middle-class families. But despite its enormous price tag, his plan would actually significantly raise taxes for millions of low- and middle-income families with children, with especially large tax increases for working single parents.

This paper explains why Trump’s latest tax plan raises taxes on so many families and provides examples of how large these tax increases would be. I conservatively estimate that Trump’s plan would increase taxes for roughly 7.8 million families with minor children. These families who would pay more taxes represent roughly 20% of households with minor children and more than half of single parents. They include roughly 25 million individuals and 15 million children.

Article: “Framing Middle-Class Insecurity: Tax and the Ideology of Unequal Economic Growth”

Article: Martha T. McCluskey, “Framing Middle-Class Insecurity: Tax and the Ideology of Unequal Economic Growth,” 84 Fordham L. Rev. 2699 (2016).

 

Article: “Perpetuating Inequality by Taxing Wealth”

Article: Goldburn P. Maynard Jr.,”Perpetuating Inequality by Taxing Wealth,” 84 Fordham L. Rev. 2429 (2016).

 

Article: “Inequality and the Mortgage Interest Deduction”

Article: Daniel Jacob Hemel & Kyle Rozema, “Inequality and the Mortgage Interest Deduction,” Tax L. Rev. (forthcoming).

The mortgage interest deduction is often criticized for contributing to after-tax income inequality. Yet the effects of the mortgage interest deduction on income inequality are more nuanced than the conventional wisdom would suggest. We show that the mortgage interest deduction causes high-income households (i.e., those in the top 10% and top 1%) to bear a larger share of the total tax burden than they would if the deduction were repealed. We further show that the effect of the mortgage interest deduction on income inequality is highly sensitive to the alternative scenario against which the deduction is evaluated. These findings demonstrate that claims about the distributional effects of the mortgage interest deduction depend critically on the counterfactual to which the status quo is compared. We extend our analysis to the deduction for state and local taxes and the charitable contribution deduction. We conclude that the appropriate counterfactual for distributional claims is dependent upon political context — and, in particular, on the feasible set of politically acceptable reforms up for consideration.