Category Archives: Welfare

News Coverage: Behind Trump’s Plan to Overhaul the Government: Scaling Back the Safety Net

News Coverage: Glenn Thrush & Erica L. Green, Behind Trump’s Plan to Overhaul the Government: Scaling Back the Safety Net, N.Y. Times, June 22, 2018.

Advertisements

New Op-Ed: White America’s racial resentment is the real impetus for welfare cuts, study says

medicaidexpansionimageNew Op-Ed: Caitlin Dewey, White America’s racial resentment is the real impetus for welfare cuts, study says, Wash. Post, May 30, 2018.

New Op-Ed: The Not-So-Subtle Racism of Trump Era ‘Welfare Reform’

New Op-Ed: Bryce Covert, The Not-So-Subtle Racism of Trump Era ‘Welfare Reform,’ N.Y. Times, May 23, 2018.

[Important] News Coverage: Which Poor People Shouldn’t Have to Work for Aid?

[Important] News Coverage: Emily Badger & Margot Sanger-Katz, Which Poor People Shouldn’t Have to Work for Aid?, N.Y. Times, May 15, 2018. [Covering the racism of Michigan’s work requirements and rural exemptions.]

Op-Ed: New evidence shows that our anti-poverty programs, especially Social Security, work well

Op-Ed: Michael Hiltzik, New evidence shows that our anti-poverty programs, especially Social Security, work well, Chicago Tribune, May 8, 2018.

Cass Sunstein weighs in on Trump’s Executive Order on Poverty: Trump’s Promising Plan to Link Welfare to Work

Here: Cass R. Sunstein, Trump’s Promising Plan to Link Welfare to Work, Bloomberg.net, Apr. 24, 2018. Needless-to-say, I do not agree. My take on the order is here. I think the best response to Sunstein on this would be to highlight that political reality matters. Sunstein doesn’t seem to understand what the emphasis on work requirements in the executive order is really about.

Op-Ed/Harvard Law Review Blog entry: “Pulling from a Dated Playbook: President Trump’s Executive Order on Poverty”

Trump-Signing-Executive-OrderEzra Rosser, Pulling from a Dated Playbook: President Trump’s Executive Order on Poverty, Harvard Law Review Blog, Apr. 18, 2018.

Trump signs Executive Order Reducing Poverty in America by Promoting Opportunity and Economic Mobility

The executive order is here. A Vox story presenting its main features is here. In happier and somewhat related news, Paul Ryan announced today that he is not seeking reelection.

Hopefully I will find a placement for the response op-ed I wrote today (though at 1,500 words, it is a bit long for a standard op-ed). . . .

New Article: “Changing Welfare as We Know it, Again: Reforming the Welfare Reform Act to Provide All Drug Felons Access to Food Stamps”

New Article: Meghan Looney Paresky, Changing Welfare as We Know it, Again: Reforming the Welfare Reform Act to Provide All Drug Felons Access to Food Stamps, 58 B.C. L. Rev. 1659 (2017). Abstract below:

Approximately half a million Americans are currently incarcerated for drug convictions at the state and federal level. President Clinton’s 1996 enactment of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (“PRWORA”) affects this enormous class of individuals by including a provision that places a lifetime ban on access to welfare benefits, including food stamps, for individuals who have been convicted of a drug felony. Although there is an option within PRWORA for states to modify or opt out of the provision, six states and territories still enforce the full lifetime ban, and most states have some form of the ban in effect. This provision, introduced as a part of the “tough on drugs” initiative of the 1990s, disparately affects minorities and low-income communities and serves to perpetuate the cycle of recidivism. Thus, Congress must amend PRWORA to eliminate the drug felony component altogether, so that individuals with drug felony convictions are no longer singled out amongst felons to be denied access to food stamps. In the short term, the United States Department of Agriculture should promote uniformity across states by introducing a model reform of the PRWORA drug felony provision for states to follow. These modifications will combat the grave societal problems imposed by the PRWORA drug felony provision, and allow all convicted drug felons to obtain important welfare benefits, including food stamps.

New Article: “The Privatized American Family”

New Article: Maxine Eichner, The Privatized American Family, 93 Notre Dame L. Rev. 213 (2017). Abstract below:

Part I of this Article describes the privatized-family model that dominates U.S. law and policy today, as well as the negative effects this model is having in the contemporary United States. Part II turns to U.S. history, investigating the national conversation regarding the appropriate relationship among the government-market-family triad. As historian Robert Self put it, competing narratives of the place of families are “deeply etched in competing narratives of national identity,” and are fundamental to our social contract. Part II first considers the narratives that supported the rise of the twentieth-century welfare state, which regulated the market to support families. It then contrasts these with the justifications for dismantling welfare-state protections at the end of the century, which introduced the privatized-family model. I argue that the vision underlying this newer regulatory model does not adequately support the important functions that families serve.

Finally, Part III offers my “buffered-spheres” model as a better alternative for regulating the market-family relationship. This model would delink provision of the conditions families need to thrive from their individual market power. Under this model, the state would no longer stand aside as a neutral party when it comes to whether families can obtain the necessary conditions for sound families, but would actively facilitate these conditions. In today’s economy, this means that regulation would not only encourage adults to work, as it does today, but would also ensure parents publicly paid parental leave, ensure children optimal early childhood education while parents work, and support all adults being able to go home at the end of the workday.