Category Archives: Welfare

Op-Ed: Joe Kennedy III & Peter Edelman, “Donald Trump’s Budget Cuts Would Leave Many Americans Hungry”

Op-Ed: Joe Kennedy III & Peter Edelman, “Donald Trump’s Budget Cuts Would Leave Many Americans Hungry,” Time, June 29, 2017.

News Article: “Nevada May Become First State To Offer Medicaid To All, Regardless Of Income”

News Article: Alison Kodjack, “Nevada May Become First State To Offer Medicaid To All, Regardless Of Income“, All Things Considered, NPR, June 13, 2017.

New Book: “The Poverty of Privacy Rights”

KBNew Book: Khiara M. Bridges, The Poverty of Privacy Rights (Stanford Univ. Press, 2017). Overview below:

The Poverty of Privacy Rights makes a simple, controversial argument: Poor mothers in America have been deprived of the right to privacy.

The U.S. Constitution is supposed to bestow rights equally. Yet the poor are subject to invasions of privacy that can be perceived as gross demonstrations of governmental power without limits. Courts have routinely upheld the constitutionality of privacy invasions on the poor, and legal scholars typically understand marginalized populations to have “weak versions” of the privacy rights everyone else enjoys. Khiara M. Bridges investigates poor mothers’ experiences with the state—both when they receive public assistance and when they do not. Presenting a holistic view of just how the state intervenes in all facets of poor mothers’ privacy, Bridges shows how the Constitution has not been interpreted to bestow these women with family, informational, and reproductive privacy rights. Bridges seeks to turn popular thinking on its head: Poor mothers’ lack of privacy is not a function of their reliance on government assistance—rather it is a function of their not bearing any privacy rights in the first place. Until we disrupt the cultural narratives that equate poverty with immorality, poor mothers will continue to be denied this right.

The introduction is also available on SSRN here.

New Pathways Issue: “State of the Union 2017”

SOTU_cover_smallNew Pathways : “State of the Union 2017” (Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality 2017). Table of contents below:

Executive Summary
Are our country’s policies for reducing racial and ethnic inequalities getting the job done? The simple answer: No.
Employment
Even after the recovery, 1 in 9 African Americans and 1 in 6 Hispanics fear a job loss within one year. Why?
Poverty
We remain two Americas: a high-poverty America for blacks, Hispanics, and Native Americans, and a (relatively) low-poverty America for whites and Asians.
Safety Net
The safety net, which is supposed to serve an equalizing function, sometimes works to exacerbate racial and ethnic inequalities within the low-income population.
Housing
Whereas 1 in 6 black and Hispanic households dedicate at least half of their income to housing costs, only 1 in 12 white households do. How did that happen?
Education
Between 1990 and 2015, average academic performance improved for students of all racial and ethnic groups, but grew fastest among black and Hispanic students. The result: White-black and white-Hispanic achievement gaps declined by 15 to 25 percent.
Incarceration
Did you think that all that talk about criminal justice reform has brought about a sea change in racial inequalities in incarceration? Think again.
Health
Large and persistent racial gaps in health are not the product of our genes but the consequences of our policies and history.
Earnings
Between 1970 and 2010, the earnings gap between whites and other groups has narrowed, but most of that decline was secured in the immediate aftermath of the Civil Rights Movement.
Wealth
African-Americans have less than 8 cents and Hispanics less than 10 cents of wealth for every dollar amassed by whites.
Intergenerational Mobility
The persistence of poverty has long been stronger for blacks than whites. However, beginning with generations that came of age in the mid-1960s, the white-black gap in the chance of escaping poverty has closed significantly.

Podcast: “What would happen to SNAP if proposed $191 billion cut became law?”

Elaine Waxman and Jonathan Schwabish, “What would happen to SNAP if proposed $191 billion cut became law?“, The Urban Institute, May 30, 2017.

News Article: “Food stamps: a lifeline for America’s poor that Trump wants to cut”

David Smith and Dominic Rushe, “Food stamps: a lifeline for America’s poor that Trump wants to cut“, The Guardian, May 28, 2017.

News Article: “Trauma and the Welfare State: A Genealogy of Prostitution Courts in New York City”

New Article: Amy J. Cohen, Trauma and the Welfare State: A Genealogy of Prostitution Courts in New York City, 95 Tex. L. Rev. 915 (2017).

New Op-Ed: “The GOP hates red tape — except when it comes to poor people”

New Op-Ed: Noah Zatz, The GOP hates red tape — except when it comes to poor people, Wash. Post, May 30, 2017.

News Article: “The People Left Behind When Only the ‘Deserving’ Poor Get Help”

News Article: Annie Lowrey, The People Left Behind When Only the ‘Deserving’ Poor Get Help, The Atlantic, May 25, 2017.

News Article: “Trump’s Budget Is What Class Warfare Looks Like”

News Article: Greg Kaufmann, Trump’s Budget is What Class Warfare Looks Like, Talk Poverty, May 26, 2017