Upcoming Symposium: “Public Interest Mobilization and Access to Justice Movements in the New Democratic State” — Wisconsin Law Review Symposium, October 27, 2017

Full schedule available here.

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Legal Academy News: “Civil Rights Center at UNC Law School Shut Down”

News coverage here.

Op-Ed: “Unemployment in Black and White”

The Editorial Board, Unemployment in Black and White, Washington Post, August 28, 2017. [“The hard truth is that the persistence of twice-as-high joblessness for black workers has led policy makers to accept it as normal.”]

Op-ed: “We’re all for supporting states’ rights, except when it comes to the poor”

Op-ed: Ezra Rosser, We’re all for supporting states’ rights, except when it comes to the poor, The Hill, Sept. 11, 2017. [Covering a decision of the Dept. of Health and Human Services to no longer permit state waivers from TANF work requirements.]

Op-Ed: “Of course we’ll help Texas. Sometimes government actually is the answer.”

Op-Ed: Garrison Keillor, Of course we’ll help Texas. Sometimes government actually is the answer, Denver Post / Washington Post, Sept. 5, 2017. [Could be a good class assignment about government / risk / obligations.]

Op-Ed: “In California, poor people go to jail, rich people go free. How long will this go on?”

Editorial Board, In California, poor people go to jail, rich people go free. How long will this go on?, The Sacramento Bee, August 28, 2017. [A look into California’s cash bail system and its disparate effect on California’s less fortunate.]

Op-Ed: “Teaching Hurricane Harvey: Ideas and Resources”

Katherine Schulten, Michael Gonchar, Caroline Crossom Giplin, Teaching Hurricane Harvey: Ideas and Resources, New York Times, August 31, 2017. [New perspectives on the natural disaster discourse.]

Article: “The Desert of the Unreal: Inequality in Virtual Augmented Reality”

Mary A. Franks, The Desert of the Unreal: Inequality in Virtual Augmented Reality, SSRN Aug. 8th, 2017. Abstract below:

 

The world we all live in is structured by inequality: of gender, race, class, sexual orientation, disability, and more. The promoters of virtual and augmented reality often claim that they offer a more perfect world, one that offers more stimulation, more connection, more freedom, more equality. For such technologies to be considered truly innovative, they should in some sense move us beyond our current limitations and prejudices. But when existing inequalities are unacknowledged and unaddressed in the “real” world, they tend to be replicated and augmented in virtual realities. We make new worlds based on who we are and what we do in old ones. All of our worlds, virtual and physical, are the product of human choice and human creation. The developers of virtual and augmented reality make choices about which aspects of our lived history they want to replicate, enhance, or change. The design – and design flaws – of new virtual and augmented reality technologies reveal much about the values of their developers and their consumers, providing a unique opportunity to evaluate just how innovative new technologies are with regard to social inequality.

 

Op-Ed: “The biggest beneficiaries of the government safety net: Working-class whites”

Tracy Jan, The biggest beneficiaries of the government safety net: Working-class whites, Washington Post, February 16, 2017. [Commentary on the true effect of the government assistance and tax credit programs of 2014.]

Op-Ed: “People who get Medicaid are made to feel powerless. That pushes them out of politics and toward fatalism.”

Jamila Michener, People who get Medicaid are made to feel powerless. That pushes them out of politics and toward fatalism.People who get Medicaid are made to feel powerless. That pushes them out of politics and toward fatalism.People who get Medicaid are made to feel powerless. That pushes them out of politics and toward fatalism., Washington Post Aug. 17, 2017. [An empirical approach to the emotional and psychological effects of Medicaid reception.]