Wisconsin Law Review Issue on Experiential Learning

Though this is more of an internal law school topic as opposed to strictly poverty law, I thought this issue of the Wisconsin Law Review worth highlighting because of the connections to clinics and other ways in which law students can do poverty law related work.

Three articles from Wisconsin Law Review on Experiential Learning

Commentary
Does Experiential Learning Improve JD Employment Outcomes?

Jason Webb Yackee

This short article provides an empirical examination of the link between law school experiential learning opportunities and JD employment outcomes. The paper is motivated by the so-called “law school crisis” that has accompanied the bursting of the housing bubble and the ensuing Great Recession. As most readers know, the market for new lawyers collapsed during the recession. Applications to law schools initially rose, but have since fallen dramatically. Entry-level legal hiring remains sluggish, and law school applications remain at or near historic lows.

Assessing Experiential Legal Education: A Response to Professor Yackee

Keith A. Findley

My colleague Jason Yackee offers some interesting data on comparative rates of law-related job placement for graduates of the top 100 U.S. law schools.1 In the end, his analysis in part reaches the entirely unsurprising conclusion that higher-ranked law schools are more successful at placing their graduates in full-time law-related jobs than are lower-ranked schools (although it turns out that holds true only for those in the top 50). . . . Read more

Measuring Clinical Legal Education’s Employment Outcomes

Robert R. Kuehn

Clinical training is one of the most significant developments in legal education over the last century. Legal education experts and bar committees have praised clinical education’s ability to teach law students the competencies necessary for the practice of law and a sense of their professional identity and obligations. Some even identify the added benefit of aiding J.D. students in securing employment and possible negative impact of inadequate skills training on the job market for graduates.

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