Category Archives: Uncategorized

News Article: “One Woman’s Slide from Middle Class to Medicaid”

Paper: “Grid Modernization and Energy Poverty”

Shelley Holliday Welton, Grid Modernization and Energy Poverty, 18 N.C. J. L. & Tech. 4 (2017).

News Article: “A Smarter Way to Regulate Panhandling”

 

Brendan O’Flaherty & Gwendolyn Dordick, “A Smarter Way to Regulate Panhandling“, Citylab, July 11, 2017.

 

Call-for-Papers: “HUD’s Past, Present and Future”

Call-for-Papers: “HUD’s Past, Present and Future” – Monday, November 13, 2017 and Tuesday, November 14, 2017 at University of Detroit Mercy School of Law. Full details here: HUD’S PAST PRESENT AND FUTURE SYMPOSIUM.

Book: “Race, Class, and Politics in the Cappuccino City”

Derek S. Hyra, Race, Class, and Politics in the Cappuccino City (2017).

Call-for-Papers: “Reconsidering the Roles and Responsibilities of the Law School as Advocate in the New Normal of Federal Policy” — AALS, Jan. 2018

Call-for-Papers: “Reconsidering the Roles and Responsibilities of the Law School as Advocate in the New Normal of Federal Policy” — AALS, Jan. 2018. The joint call-for-papers from the Clinical Law and Poverty Law sections can be found here: Clinical and Poverty Call for Papers FINAL

Call-for-Panelists: “Innovations in Teaching Access to Justice Across the Law School Curriculum” — AALS Jan. 2018

Call-for-Panelists: Innovations in Teaching Access to Justice Across the Law School Curriculum — 2018 AALS Annual Meeting – Open Source Program, Friday, January 5, 2018, 8:30 – 10:15 a.m.

We invite applications to speak on a panel about how law school faculty can
innovate in the classroom to create future attorneys who are concerned about access to
justice and playing a role in solving the access to justice crisis. Each panelist will speak
about a recent experiment incorporating access to justice into the law school curriculum.
We hope to identify an additional panelist who has (or will in the Fall 2017 semester)
integrated access to justice concepts in a first-year or core law school course.
The program will begin with a roundtable discussion of each panelist’s recent
efforts to highlight and incorporate access to justice in their own classrooms. The
program will continue with a facilitated discussion that will allow audience members to
share and develop their own classroom experiments, including ideas to incorporate access to justice in core and first-year courses. The planned panelists are Anna Carpenter
(Tulsa), Lauren Sudeall Lucas (Georgia State), Victor Quintanilla (Indiana), and Colleen
Shanahan (Temple).

To be considered as a panelist, please email a short (1-2 paragraph) statement of
interest and description of your recent or upcoming effort to teach access to justice in the
classroom to Colleen Shanahan (colleen.shanahan@temple.edu) by September 1.

New Report: “Ban the Box and Racial Discrimination: A Review of the Evidence and Policy Recommendations”

New Report: Christina Plerhoples & Stacy Mychal Cohen, Ban the Box and Racial Discrimination: A Review of the Evidence and Policy Recommendations (Urban Institute 2017).

New Article: “Rendered Invisible: African American Low-Wage Workers and the Workplace Exploitation Paradigm”

New Article: Llezlie Green Coleman, Rendered Invisible: African American Low-Wage Workers and the Workplace Exploitation Paradigm, 60 Howard L.J. 61 (2016). Abstract below:

The narrative of low-wage worker exploitation has increasingly narrowed in focus to reflect the experiences of undocumented immigrant workers whose immigration status makes them particularly vulnerable to wage theft and other denials of their substantive workplace rights. Indeed, much of the scholarship in this area rests solidly at the intersection of immigrant justice and employment law. This article disrupts this paradigm by arguing that this limited narrative has rendered African American low-wage workers invisible. It also draws from the voices of low-wage worker advocates who have borrowed from current activism to announce that #BlackWorkersMatter. Given the role of paradigms in defining which issues merit our attention, analysis, and assessment, this article argues for a shift in the scholarly conversation to consider not only the historical reasons for the distancing of African Americans from worker advocacy, but also the current dynamics that have facilitated this phenomenon. This article draws from critical race theorists’ black/white binary analysis to consider whether there exists an immigrant/non-immigrant binary paradigm in the analyses of low-wage worker exploitation. Finally, it considers the particular vulnerabilities and disadvantages this paradigm creates for African American workers.

Paper: “A Home of One’s Own: The Fight Against Illegal Housing Discrimination Based on Criminal Convictions, and Those Who Are Still Left Behind”