Category Archives: Uncategorized

New Op-Ed: What a ‘Living Wage’ Actually Means

New Op-Ed: Eric Ravenscraft, What a ‘Living Wage’ Actually Means, NYTimes.com, June 5, 2019. If you ask a dozen lawmakers what constitutes a “living wage,” you’ll get a dozen answers. Where does the term come from? And is it even accurate?

New [Short] Article: Republican Homeowning

New [Short] Article: Robert Hockett, Republican Homeowning, Challenge, DOI:
10.1080/05775132.2019.1606541 (2019). [Note: downloading may require university library access.] Abstract below:

The future of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac remains muddled. But the author, a Cornell law professor, argues there is only one course of action. Such entities are among our most important public utilities, behind the Federal Reserve and the federal government itself, and should be owned by the citizenry.

News Coverage: Four years, $13 million and dozens of hands: How ‘affordable housing’ gets made in America

News Coverage: Andrea Riquier, Four years, $13 million and dozens of hands: How ‘affordable housing’ gets made in America, MarketWatch, May 25, 2019 [fairly lengthy].

News Coverage: Separated by Design: How Some of America’s Richest Towns Fight Affordable Housing

News Coverage: Jacqueline Rabe Thomas, Separated by Design: How Some of America’s Richest Towns Fight Affordable Housing, ProPublica & Connecticut Mirror, May 22, 2019.

New Article: A Wall of Hate: Eminent Domain and Interest-Convergence

New Article: Philip Lee, A Wall of Hate: Eminent Domain and Interest-Convergence, 84 Brooklyn L. Rev. 421 (2019).

Call-for-Papers: Advancing Health Equity by Addressing Social Determinants of Health, Poverty, and Racial Disparities [AALS Law, Medicine & Health Care Section and the Poverty Law Sections]

Call for Proposals: Advancing Health Equity by Addressing Social Determinants of Health, Poverty, and Racial Disparities

The Law, Medicine & Health Care Section and the Poverty Law Section of the AALS are pleased to announce a Call for Proposals for our co-sponsored program to be held during the AALS 2020 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, January 4, 2020 from 9am-12pm. This three hour session will be divided into two Parts, as described below.

Part 1: Call for Scholarly Presenters Concerning Advancing Health Equity by Addressing Social Determinants of Health, Poverty, and Racial Disparities

Many academic institutions, government agencies, non-profit organizations, and policymakers have begun to focus on achieving health equity by addressing the social determinants of health, poverty, and racial disparities.  Although this has become a movement, it is unclear whether those involved in the movement understand that to obtain health equity, we must address structural and institutional issues that cause inequity and advance justice for individuals and communities.  Legal scholarship is beginning to explore the ways in which law, policies, and systems can be leveraged to reduce disparities and address social determinants of health for those marginalized by virtue of race, poverty, or both.  Part I of this Program will feature 2-3 presenters from this Call for Papers, who will present their scholarship exploring these issues, alongside an expert from the medical field who will present on this topic.

Part 2: Call for Facilitators for Interactive Discussions on Teaching Health Equity by Addressing Social Determinants of Health, Poverty, and Racial Disparities

Many government officials, non-profit organizations, and policymakers have begun to focus on achieving health equity by addressing the social determinants of health, poverty, and racial disparities.  Although this has become a movement, it is unclear whether those involved in this charge understand what health equity means and thus whether this will have a positive change on laws and policies that will result in health equity. In this context, teaching health equity, social determinants of health, poverty law, and racial disparities is an important endeavor to ensure that students will be able to promote meaningful change in law and policy.  The question is how do we teach these issues to prepare students to advance justice in these areas and to serve as a resource for policy change. In this section we plan to foster an interactive discussion to explore questions, such as:

  • How do we incorporate a discussion of civil rights, human rights, poverty, public health laws and theories in our teaching?
  • How do we translate the health equity language from psychology, medicine, and public health into legal doctrines?
  • How do we integrate the discussion of different status (i.e. race, gender identification, sexual orientation, class, disability, etc) into the discussion of health equity?
  • How do we teach in this challenging field?
  • Are team teaching methods particularly useful?
  • How can incorporate learners or professionals from other disciplines, such as medical students or physicians, in our teaching on these topics?
  • Is this a rich area for experiential learning, such as legal advocacy to address social determinants of health in law clinics or practicum courses or the creation of policy briefs, model legislation, or amicus briefs?
  • Can we leverage the power of the internet to teach more effectively?

Part II will involve an interactive discussion about teaching strategies on this topic, for which we are seeking 3-4 facilitators who will share their teaching innovations and challenges and facilitate interactive discussions.

Call for Proposals

We welcome the submission of a one-page proposal (500 words or fewer) for Part 1 or Part 2.  In your submission, please include your preference for participation in Part 1 (traditional scholarly presentation) or Part 2 (facilitation of an interactive discussion on teaching health equity) and indicate whether you’re interested in being considered for publication in the Journal of Legal Medicine, pursuant to the guidelines below.

Submit your proposal by email to Professor Ruqaiijah Yearby at ruqaiijah.yearby@slu.edu by August 5th with the email subject line “AALS LHMC 2020 Submission.”

Publication Opportunity

Submission method and deadline

Proposals selected for Part 1 and 2 of the AALS program will be reviewed for a publication opportunity in the Journal of Legal Medicine if interest in publication is indicated in the proposal.

Submission review

Proposals will be selected for publication after a review by Leslie E. Wolf, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Legal Medicine, and two anonymous referees.   Your final article is due by February 15, 2020 and will undergo peer review.

Publication

Selected papers will be published in the Journal of Legal Medicine, an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal that focuses on the intersection of health, law, science and policy. It publishes short commentaries (up to 3,000 words) and articles (up to 7,500 words), although longer articles may be published. The Journal publishes four issues a year, and accepts submissions year-round.  For more information about aims and scope of the Journal of Legal Medicine see:https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ulgm20&

Inquiries or questions

Any inquiries about the Call for Proposals should be submitted to Professor Yael Cannon at Georgetown University Law Center at yc708@georgetown.edu or Professor Ruqaiijah Yearby at Saint Louis University at ruqaiijah.yearby@slu.edu

Call-for-Papers: Children’s Rights, Civil Rights, Poverty, Etc., in honor of Marian Wright Edelman [New York University Annual Survey of American Law]

Call-for-Papers: Children’s Rights, Civil Rights, Poverty, Etc., in honor of Marian Wright Edelman [New York University Annual Survey of American Law]. Submission deadline June 17, 2019.

News Coverage: Many Adults Would Struggle to Find $400, the Fed Finds

News Coverage: Jeanna Smialek, Many Adults Would Struggle to Find $400, the Fed Finds, N.Y. Times, May 23, 2019.

New Article: The New Housing Segregation: The Jim Crow Effects of Crime-Free Housing Ordinances

New Article: Deborah N. Archer, The New Housing Segregation: The Jim Crow Effects of Crime-Free Housing Ordinances, forthcoming Mich. L. Rev. Abstract below:

America is profoundly segregated along racial lines. We attend separate schools, live in separate neighborhoods, attend different churches, and shop at different stores. This rigid racial segregation results in social, economic, and resource inequality, with White communities of opportunity on the one hand, and many communities of color without access to quality schools, jobs, transportation, or health care on the other. Many people view this as an unfortunate fact of life, or as a relic of legal systems long-since overturned, and beyond the reach of current legal process. But this is not true. On the contrary, the law continues to play a profound role in creating and legitimizing patterns of racial segregation all across America. Crime-free housing ordinances are one of the most salient examples of the role law plays in producing and sustaining racial segregation today. They are, in this respect, a critical mechanism for effectuating the new housing segregation.

Crime-free housing ordinances are local laws that either encourage or require private landlords to evict or exclude tenants who have had varying levels of contact with the criminal legal system. Though formally race neutral, these laws facilitate racial segregation in a number of significant ways. This is the first law review article to explain precisely how they do so. The Article contends that crime-free housing ordinances enable racial segregation by importing the racial biases, racial logics, and racial disparities of the criminal legal system into private housing markets. While scholars have examined the important role local laws played in effectuating racial inequality, they have not paid attention to crime-free housing ordinances. In addition to foregrounding how crime-free housing ordinances reinforce and perpetuate racially segregated communities, this Article proposes an intervention: a “segregative effects” claim, an underutilized cause of action under the Fair Housing Act of 1968, to challenge this segregative impact. While this intervention would not end the pervasive nature of housing segregation across the United States, it could eliminate at least one of the causes of this persistent problem: a body of law whose formal race neutrality has obscured its racially segregative effects.

News Coverage: The End of the Line

News Coverage: Dan Kaufman, The End of the Line, N.Y. Times Magazine, May 1, 2019. [Great, long, article about the closing of a car factory, with good photos, and great worker profiles–my favorite being a worker discussing the air traffic controller strike.]