Category Archives: Employment

New Article: “The Striking Power Of Poverty To Turn Young Boys Into Jobless Men”

New Article: “The Striking Power of Poverty To Turn Young Boys Into Jobless Men” – The Washington Post

New Article: “Some Cities Are Still More Unequal Than Others – An Update”

New Article: “Some Cities Are Still More Unequal Than Others – An Update” – Brookings

New Article: “All Hollowed Out”

New Article: “All Hollowed Out” – The Atlantic

News Coverage / Feature Article: For the poor in the Deep South’s cities, simply applying for a job exposes the barriers of a particularly pervasive and isolating form of poverty | The Washington Post

News Coverage: For the poor in the Deep South’s cities, simply applying for a job exposes the barriers of a particularly pervasive and isolating form of poverty | The Washington Post

Blog Entries: ACSBLOG symposium on labor and economic inequality

Here, featuring contributions by Ruben Garcia, Brishen Rogers, Mike Selmi, and Noah Zatz.

News Coverage: How Much Sympathy Do Overwhelmed White-Collar Workers Deserve? – The Atlantic

News Coverage: How Much Sympathy Do Overwhelmed White-Collar Workers Deserve? – The Atlantic

New Article: “Stabilizing Low-Wage Work”

New Article: Charlotte Alexander, Anna Haley-Lock & Nantiya Ruan, Stabilizing Low-Wage Work, 50 Harv. C.R.-C.L. L. Rev. 1 (2015).  Abstract below:

Low-wage, hourly-paid service workers are increasingly subject to employers’ “just-in-time” scheduling practices. In a just-in-time model, employers give workers little advance notice of their schedules, call workers in to work during non-scheduled times to meet unexpected customer demand, and send workers home early when business is slow. The federal Fair Labor Standards Act, the main guarantor of workers’ wage and hour rights, provides no remedy for the unpredictable work hours and income instability caused by employers’ last minute call-in and send-home practices. This Article examines two alternative
sources of legal protection that have received little attention in the literature on low-wage work: provisions in unionized workers’ collective bargaining agreements that guarantee a minimum number of hours of pay when workers are
called in to or sent home from work unexpectedly, and state laws that contain similar guaranteed-pay provisions. The Article concludes by assessing these
tools’ effectiveness in stabilizing low-wage work.

New Article: ““The Help that We Get”: Racial Differences in Private Safety Nets and the Scarring Effects of Unemployment Following the Great Recession”

New Article: Alix Gould-Werth, “The Help that We Get”: Racial Differences in Private Safety Nets and the Scarring Effects of Unemployment Following the Great Recession, National Poverty Center Working Paper Series #14-01 (2014).

New Article: “Credit Reporting’s Vicious Cycles”

New Article: Luke Herrine, Credit Reporting’s Vicious Cycles, NYU Rev. L. & Soc. Change forthcoming, SSRN 2015.  Abstract below:

This article argues that consumer credit reports can create two sorts of vicious cycles, which can contribute to to cycles of poverty and deepen race-based disenfranchisement. The first takes place in credit markets themselves. Even on a neoclassical model of credit reporting, credit reports can amplify past problems with debt, most of which are brought on by systemic inequality. Loosening the neoclassical model reveals the possibility of even more drastic inequality amplification. The second cycle arises when credit reports are used on extra-lending contexts. In non-lending contexts such as employment credit checks, credit reports do not seem to provide any useful information to employers, but they do reinforce the first vicious cycle and the disadvantage it amplifies. In quasi-lending contexts like insurance pricing, credit reports may provide predictive information, but the information they reveal seems only to be economic instability and by forcing economically unstable individuals to pay more for insurance, they deepen their economic instability. The article concludes with several policy implications.

New Article: “Special Treatment Everywhere, Special Treatment Nowhere”

New Article: Noah D. Zatz, Special Treatment Everywhere, Special Treatment Nowhere, 95 B.U. L. Rev. 1155 (2015).