Category Archives: Urban Issues

Op-Ed: “Minority Neighborhoods Pay Higher Car Insurance Premiums Than White Areas With the Same Risk”

Julia Angwin, Jeff Larson, Lauren Kirchner and Surya Mattu, Minority Neighborhoods Pay Higher Car Insurance Premiums Than White Areas With the Same Risk, ProPublica, April 5, 2017. [“…some major insurers charge minority neighborhoods as much as 30 percent more than other areas with similar accident costs.”]

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Op-Ed: “The Safety Net is Crucial for Kids”

Chad Stone, The Safety Net is Crucial for Kids, U.S. News, October 13, 2017. [“Government programs like tax credits and SNAP are proven to lower childhood poverty rates.”]

Op-Ed: “Making America White Again”

Toni Morrison, Making America White Again, The New Yorker, November 21, 2106. [“The choices made by white men, who are prepared to abandon their humanity out of fear of black men and women, suggest the true horror of lost status.”]

New Article: “Cities, Inclusion and Exactions”

Audrey G. McFarlane, Randall K. Johnson, Cities, Inclusion and Exactions, 102 Iowa L. Rev. 2145 (2017). Abstract Below:

 

Cities across the country are adopting mandatory inclusionary zoning. Yet, consensus about the appropriate constitutional standard to measure the propriety of mandatory inclusionary zoning has not been fully reached. Under one doctrinal lens, inclusionary zoning is a valid land use regulation adopted to ensure a proper balance of housing within the jurisdiction. Under another doctrinal lens, challengers seek to characterize inclusionary zoning as an exaction, a discretionary condition subject to a heightened standard of review addressing the specific negative impact caused by an individual project on the supply of affordable housing in a jurisdiction. Drawing from the experience of Baltimore, Maryland’s inclusionary zoning ordinance, this Article considers the impact that the uncertainty in the law may have had on the type of inclusionary zoning ordinance adopted by the city. This Article argues that the conversation about inclusionary zoning,land use regulation, and exactions has been formulated in the context of imagery about development that leaves places like Baltimore out. The imagery in these narratives is of an individual landowner powerless in the face of government overreach. The reality is different in those places where land developers are not powerless and instead are often politically influential repeat players. Thus, the real problem presented may be not how to craft doctrine to prevent cities from asking too much of developers, but instead to craft doctrine that ensures cities do not give away too much.

News Coverage: “Is Anybody Home at HUD?”

News Coverage: Alec MacGillis, Is Anybody Home at HUD?, New York Magazine, Aug. 22, 2017 [a good but depressing account of HUD’s decline under Ben Carson/Trump].

Podcast: “What would happen to SNAP if proposed $191 billion cut became law?”

Elaine Waxman and Jonathan Schwabish, “What would happen to SNAP if proposed $191 billion cut became law?“, The Urban Institute, May 30, 2017.

New(ish) Symposium Published: “Law and Inequality”

I missed the publication of this symposium by the Yale Law and Policy Review so here it is a bit dated:

Law and Inequality: An American Constitution Society Conference at Yale Law School
October 16 and 17, 2015

FEATURE
Martha T. McCluskey, Frank Pasquale & Jennifer Taub
FEATURE
Frank Pasquale

News Article: “How Some Kids Escape Poverty”

News Article: Mimi Kirk, “How Some Kids Escape Poverty“, City Lab, May 19, 2017.

New Article: “The Theft of Affordable Housing: How Rent-Stabilized Apartments Are Disappearing from Fraudulent Individual Apartment Improvements and What Can Be Done to Save Them”

New Article: Justin R. La Mort, The Theft of Affordable Housing: How Rent-Stabilized Apartments Are Disappearing from Fraudulent Individual Apartment Improvements and What Can Be Done to Save Them, 40 N.Y.U. Rev. L. & Soc. Change 351 (2016).

New Report: “The Cost of Segregation National Trends and the Case of Chicago, 1990–2010”

New Report: Gregory Acs, The Cost of Segregation National Trends and the Case of Chicago, 1990–2010 (Urban Institute 2017).