Category Archives: Call for Papers

Call-for-Papers: Health Justice: Engaging Critical Perspectives in Health Law and Policy

WCL_HLP_logoThe Health Law and Policy Program at American University Washington College of Law, in partnership with ChangeLab Solutions, LLC, is soliciting proposals for presentations and discussions on the topic of “Health Justice: Engaging Critical Perspectives in Health Law and Policy.”

Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words for a 15-minute conference presentation by a single presenter or a 1-hour conference discussion featuring up to four discussion leaders. Proposed presenters may submit abstracts for both formats for consideration by conference organizers. Proposals will be accepted through April 13, 2020. Conference organizers will contact presenters no later than May 2020 to invite them to speak at the conference to be held October 1-2, 2020 in Washington, DC. ChangeLab Solutions is pleased to cover train or airfare and accommodations in our partner hotel for presenters traveling from outside the Washington metro area. Following the conference, presenters will be invited to submit proposals for articles and commentaries to be published in a symposium issue of the Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics in 2021. Submissions should be completed online at https://forms.gle/LyriL5kAejK6VXbV7. For more information, or to email a submission rather than completing the Google form, please send an email to health@wcl.american.edu with “Health Justice Conference” in the subject line.

“Health Justice: Engaging Critical Perspectives in Health Law and Policy” will foster theory, practice, and action on health justice. Our focus is on applying critical perspectives—including critical race theory, Lat Crit, ClassCrit, black feminist theory, feminist legal theory, queer theory, critical disability studies, and more—to the most pressing challenges in health law and policy. We have a big-tent vision of health law and policy, encompassing public health, health care, bioethics, and global health. We aim to encourage health law and policy scholars, advocates, workers, and justice movement activists to engage more deeply with critical perspectives. We also hope to encourage scholars, advocates, workers, and activists from various critical perspectives who have not previously engaged in the health law and policy sphere to do so as part of this project. To promote an evidence-based and policy-engaged discussion, we welcome submissions from health scientists and social scientists, in addition to our core community of legal scholars and advocates.

We welcome the submission of an accompanying Statement Regarding Diversity indicating how the proposed presenter would bring diversity to the conference and journal issue relative to the historical profile of legal academic conference presenters and JLME authors, including with respect to disciplinary perspective (e.g., racial and ethnic studies, gender studies, law, public policy, nursing, medicine, epidemiology, ethics, sociology, economics), the race, ethnicity, nationality, religion, disability, veteran status, sexual identity, or sexual orientation of the proposed presenter, the presenter’s work experience (e.g., academic, community organizer, social justice advocate, or health care worker), the extent to which the presenter works within community and social justice movements, or any other factor that the presenter would like to bring to the conference organizers’ attention. These statements will accompany anonymized submissions for consideration by the conference organizers.

 

The Health Justice: Engaging Critical Perspectives in Health Law and Policy steering committee includes Brian C. Castrucci, Brietta Clark, Sarah de Guia, Gregg Gonsalves, Angela Harris, Nan Hunter, Dayna Bowen Matthew, Seema Mohapatra, Jamila Taylor, Lindsay Wiley, and Ruqaiijah Yearby.

Conference and Call-for-Papers: 2020 SALT Teaching Conference

Conference and Call-for-Papers: 2020 SALT Teaching Conference: Social Justice in Action, Sept. 25-26, 2020, Loyola University Chicago School of Law. Call can be found here. Deadline for submissions is June 1, 2020.

Call For Papers: 2020 Law and Development Conference: “Law and Development in High Income Countries”

06 Nov 2020, Bucerius Law School, Hamburg, Germany

The Law and Development Institute (http://www.lawanddevelopment.net) and Bucerius Law School will co-host the 2020 Law and Development Conference in Hamburg, Germany.

Economic development is the term that has been associated with less developed countries in the Third World (“developing countries”), not the economically advanced countries (“developed countries”). However, development problems in high income countries are not less important. Changing economic conditions in recent decades caused stagnating wages and widening economic gaps among individual citizens and regions within developed countries. Stagnant economic growth deepening economic polarization and institutional incapacity to deal with these issues can be observed in several rich countries. Private law, public law, and institutions in general play a crucial role in addressing these problems. The conference addresses law and development issues relevant to high income countries on the following sub-topics.

– Poverty and Inequality in High Income Countries and the Role of Law

– Legal and Institutional Frameworks for Growth and Stability in High Income Countries

– The Role of State and Development in Industrialized Countries

– International Trade, WTO and Substitute Institutions

We ask all interested speakers to submit one-page paper abstracts by January 31, 2020. (Please indicate the relevant sub-topic in your submission.) We expect abstracts, papers, and presentations in English language.

IMPORTANT DEADLINES:

Abstract Submission: January 31, 2020

Notification of Acceptance: February 28, 2020

Final Selection of Speakers: March 15, 2020

Full Papers Due: September 15, 2020

Please note that all conference papers will be uploaded on the conference website and will be accessible by the general public (with the attachment of appropriate copyright notice).

Selected papers will be published in Law and Development Review Special Issue in 2021.

All speakers and participants are expected to make their own travel arrangements during the conference.

PAPER SUBMISSIONS/FURTHER INFORMATION: Please submit your abstract and conference inquiries to Law and Development Institute (Professor Y.S. Lee) by email at info@lawanddevelopment.net

Call For Papers 2020 Law and Development Conference: “Law and Development in High Income Countries”

Call For Papers
2020 Law and Development Conference: “Law and Development in High Income Countries”

06 Nov 2020, Bucerius Law School, Hamburg, Germany

The Law and Development Institute (http://www.lawanddevelopment.net) and Bucerius Law School will co-host the 2020 Law and Development Conference in Hamburg, Germany.

Economic development is the term that has been associated with less developed countries in the Third World (“developing countries”), not the economically advanced countries (“developed countries”). However, development problems in high income countries are not less important. Changing economic conditions in recent decades caused stagnating wages and widening economic gaps among individual citizens and regions within developed countries. Stagnant economic growth deepening economic polarization and institutional incapacity to deal with these issues can be observed in several rich countries. Private law, public law, and institutions in general play a crucial role in addressing these problems. The conference addresses law and development issues relevant to high income countries on the following sub-topics.

– Poverty and Inequality in High Income Countries and the Role of Law
– Legal and Institutional Frameworks for Growth and Stability in High Income Countries
– The Role of State and Development in Industrialized Countries
– International Trade, WTO and Substitute Institutions

We ask all interested speakers to submit one-page paper abstracts by January 31, 2020. (Please indicate the relevant sub-topic in your submission.) We expect abstracts, papers, and presentations in English language.

IMPORTANT DEADLINES:
Abstract Submission: January 31, 2020
Notification of Acceptance: February 28, 2020
Final Selection of Speakers: March 15, 2020
Full Papers Due: September 15, 2020

Please note that all conference papers will be uploaded on the conference website and will be accessible by the general public (with the attachment of appropriate copyright notice).

Selected papers will be published in Law and Development Review Special Issue in 2021.

All speakers and participants are expected to make their own travel arrangements during the conference.

PAPER SUBMISSIONS/FURTHER INFORMATION: Please submit your abstract and conference inquiries to Law and Development Institute (Professor Y.S. Lee) by email at info@lawanddevelopment.net

Call-for-Papers & Conference: 11th Annual Conference on Law, Property, and Society

Call-for-Papers & Conference: 11th Annual Conference on Law, Property, and Society. ALPS will hold its 11th annual meeting at Tulane University Law School in New Orleans, Louisiana on May 21­–23, 2020. Call-for-papers deadline Jan. 31, 2020.

-This is a property conference but always has quite a few papers focusing on poverty-related issues such as affordable housing, homelessness, and inequality.

Call-for-Proposals: 2020 Detroit Mercy Law Review Symposium: Race, Class, and Environmental Justice

Call-for-Proposals: 2020 Detroit Mercy Law Review Symposium: Race, Class, and Environmental Justice, March 6, 2020. Deadline for proposals: Friday, October 18, 2019.

Call below:

The University of Detroit Mercy Law Review seeks proposals for its 104th annual Symposium, which will focus on Race, Class, and Environmental Justice and will be held Friday, March 6, 2019 [sic], in Detroit, Michigan.  Proposals, which should be approximately 250–500 words, are due no later than 5 p.m. EST on Friday, October 18, 2019.  Possible topics include, but are not limited to: the impact of water and air quality issues on marginalized people; the history of ecological inequities and the law; legal approaches to climate change and global warming; challenges arising from efforts to increase the use of renewable energy; legal and equitable issues connected with deep decarbonization projects; and any other topic related to race, class, and environmental justice.  Please include a current CV with your proposal and indicate whether the proposal is for a presentation only, or whether you also plan to submit an article for possible publication.  Preference will be given to proposals that include plans for an article, which will be due to the Law Review on Friday, March 13, 2019 [sic].  Proposals and questions should be directed to Bridget Underhill, Symposium Director, at underhbl@udmercy.edu.

Call-for-Papers: University of Pennsylvania Law Review’s Fifth Annual Public Interest Essay Competition

Call-for-Papers: University of Pennsylvania Law Review, [Fifth Annual Public Interest Essay Competition], deadline for submission is January 11, 2020.

The University of Pennsylvania Law Review is pleased to announce its fifth annual Public Interest Essay Competition. The Competition is a national writing competition for student-authored articles on the topic of social justice and public interest law. The winner will be awarded a $5,000 grant to implement a public interest project related to the article and a $500 cash prize. The Law Review is committed to improving the surrounding community in Philadelphia and the national legal community as a whole. Through this Competition, the Law Review seeks to serve this mission by publishing serious legal scholarship focused on social justice and public interest law.

Competition Details below:

Prizes:

The winning essay will be published in the University of Pennsylvania Law Review Online. The author will receive a $5,000 grant to support his/her related public interest work or the work of a non-profit organization or pro bono clinic. In addition, the author will receive a $500 cash prize.

Topic:

Submissions must focus on a specific legal issue within the realm of public interest law, including any issue relating to social justice or advancing the general welfare and good of the public. In addition, the author must include a brief grant proposal for $5,000 to support public interest work related to the essay topic. We encourage topics that are national in breadth or impact, rather than state-limited, but this is not required.

Deadline for Submission:

The University of Pennsylvania Law Review is currently accepting submissions for its fourth annual Public Interest Essay Competition. The deadline for submission is January 11, 2020, via the online submission portal.

Eligibility:

The competition is open to all current law students (Classes of 2020, 2021, and 2022) from any ABA-accredited American law school as well as recent graduates of such institutions from the classes of 2013 through 2019. Submissions are limited to one per person and must be an original, unpublished academic essay.

Essay and Grant Proposal Requirements:

Essays must be submitted in PDF format and include footnote citations. Submissions must have a title and be no longer than 6,000 words, including footnotes. All submissions will be considered anonymously. Therefore, students must ensure that their essays do not contain any identifying information, such as name, class year, or institutional affiliation.

The grant proposal must be 500 words or less and request support for a non-profit organization, a pro bono clinic, or for the author’s own public interest work. The cause supported must relate to the essay topic and the best proposals will be designed to implement the novel legal thinking argued for in the essay. The proposal must include a six-month budget and contact information for the primary recipient of the funds. If the author proposes to support a non-profit or clinic, he/she must also include a brief description of the organization’s activities and mission.

Judging Process and Notification of Winner:

The Penn Law Review Public Interest Committee will consider all submissions anonymously. The best submissions will demonstrate originality and superior literary effort that advances the interests and understanding of a specific topic within the broad arena of public interest and the law. That submission will include a thoughtful proposal for how the grant could help to implement the theory proposed. The winner will be announced in the spring of 2020 and will be published in Volume 168 of the University of Pennsylvania Law Review Online. The winner will be asked to submit a progress report detailing the use of the grant and its outcomes six months after the distribution of the award.

Questions:

All questions can be submitted to Nicole Malick, the Volume 168 Philanthropy Editor, at malickn@pennlaw.upenn.edu.

Call-for-Proposals: Global Grand Challenge: Voices for Economic Opportunity

Call-for-Proposals: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Global Grand Challenge: Voices for Economic Opportunity, grandchallenges.org, September 18, 2019.

Summary below:

Over the past few years, our team at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has been travelling to communities across the U.S. to meet with people where they live to learn about economic mobility and opportunity from their perspectives. We hoped that what they shared would help us work effectively alongside the many successful organizations that have spent years fighting for more opportunity for more Americans. We heard them clearly when they spoke about the deeply rooted, entangled challenges that make these issues so complex. There are no silver bullet solutions for communities suffering the effects of deindustrialization and no easy fix for structural racism.

One important theme of those conversations was the huge gap between longstanding assumptions about poverty and the reality of millions of Americans’ lives. These ingrained but inaccurate assumptions, we heard over and over again, lead to a misdiagnosis of the problem, which in turn generates ineffective and inadequate solutions.

This call for ideas is designed to support individuals and organizations interested in contributing to the long-term work of correcting mistaken assumptions and improving understanding of poverty through the actual stories of those that experience poverty – in a way that represents the core factors and challenges. This is a first step for us. We look forward to building ongoing collaborations with activists, organizers, and other committed partners to address the range of priorities they have laid out.

OVERVIEW

We’re seeking creative, compelling ideas from individuals and organizations from all sectors in the U.S. to elevate diverse voices and broaden the national conversation about poverty and economic mobility. Anyone with a great concept is welcome to apply for a $100,000 grant to develop their idea.

Call-for-Papers and Conference: “Poverty Law? Where We Go From Here,” April 10-11, 2020, UC Berkeley School of Law

Call-for-Papers and Conference: “Poverty Law? Where We Go From Here,” April 10-11, 2020, UC Berkeley School of Law, Berkeley, CA. PDF of the call here: Poverty Law Call for Papers Berkeley April 2020

Announcing the fourth biennial poverty law conference, “Poverty Law? Where We Go From Here” hosted by Berkeley Law on April 10-11, 2020. This conference will focus on the evolving nature of our collective obligation to each other, on changes to national, state, and local antipoverty programs, and on the future of poverty law as a field. This conference is a gathering for all those whose work focuses on the relationship between law and socio-economic marginality, broadly construed.

There are three main tracks to the conference:

  1. The History and/or Future of Antipoverty Efforts and Programs
  2. Antipoverty Teaching, Service, and Research
  3. General Poverty Law (subject matter not limited)

If you would like to present, please submit a title and abstract by Oct. 18, 2019 to erosser@wcl.american.edu.

Please note: there is no conference registration fee, but presenters are responsible for their own travel and lodging expenses. We look forward to seeing you in April 2020!

Conference Committee:
Abbye Atkinson (aatkinson@berkeley.edu)
Khiara Bridges (khiara.m.bridges@berkeley.edu)
Joy Milligan (jmilligan@law.berkeley.edu)
Ezra Rosser (erosser@wcl.american.edu)
Jeffrey Selbin (jselbin@berkeley.edu)
Karen Tani (ktani2@berkeley.edu)

–Let me add two things. First, I think this will be a great conference. The last three poverty law conferences (see here for 2013 at American University, here for 2016 at Seattle University, and here for 2018 at American University) have been great in terms of participation, keynote speakers, and diversity of topics. If you are doing work at all related to poverty law or vulnerable populations, please email me. Second, these conferences are big undertakings for a school and Berkeley is doing a tremendous service hosting the conference, so thank you in advance to my fellow conference committee members (and to their Dean)!

Call-for-Papers: State and Local Government Responses to the Affordable Housing Crisis

Call-for-Papers: State and Local Government Responses to the Affordable Housing Crisis. The Journal of Affordable Housing & Community Development Law (the Journal) invites articles and essays discussing how state and local governments are responding to the affordable housing crisis. Submissions of final articles and essays are due by September 1, 2019. Please email abstracts and final drafts to the Journal’s Editor-in-Chief, Stephen R. Miller, at millers@uidaho.edu. The Journal also accepts submissions on a rolling basis. Please do not hesitate to contact the Editor with any questions.

Overview below:

The Journal of Affordable Housing & Community Development Law (the Journal) invites articles and essays discussing how state and local governments are responding to the affordable housing crisis.  Example topics could include investigation of new state statues, local ordinances, or policies regarding:  rent control / rent stabilization; inclusionary zoning; source-of-income provisions; funding affordable housing; state-level affirmatively further fair housing provisions; and re-zoning single-family residential districts for higher densities.  Other relevant topics are welcome.  The Journal publishes both essays (typically 2,500–6,200 words) and articles (typically 7,000-10,000 words).

In addition, the Journal welcomes articles and essays on any of the Journal’s traditional subjects: affordable housing, fair housing and community/economic development. Topics could include important developments in the field; federal, state, local and/or private funding sources; statutes, policies or regulations; and empirical studies.

The Journal is the nation’s only law journal dedicated to affordable housing and community development law.  The Journal educates readers and provides a forum for discussion and resolution of problems in these fields by publishing articles from distinguished law professors, policy advocates and practitioners.

Interested authors are encouraged to send an abstract describing their proposals. Submissions of final articles and essays are due by September 1, 2019. Please email abstracts and final drafts to the Journal’s Editor-in-Chief, Stephen R. Miller, at millers@uidaho.edu. The Journal also accepts submissions on a rolling basis. Please do not hesitate to contact the Editor with any questions.