New Article: “Housing Changing Households: Regulatory Challenges for Micro-Units and Accessory Dwelling Units”

New Article: John Infranca, Housing Changing Households: Regulatory Challenges for Micro-Units and Accessory Dwelling Units, 25 Stan.L.& Pol’y Rev. 53 (2014).  Abstract below:

Available housing units frequently fail to match the needs of a city’s evolving household forms. In response to unmet demand and illegal units, some jurisdictions have altered regulations to permit the development of different types of housing, including both accessory dwelling units (ADUs) and micro-units. Developers in a variety of jurisdictions, however, have shown interest in both unit types. This Article provides the first comprehensive study of regulatory challenges to both ADUs and micro-units in a geographically diverse range of jurisdictions, focusing on micro-unit and ADU development in New York, Washington, D.C., Austin, Denver, and Seattle. The Article discusses how changing household composition is resulting in a mismatch between housing needs and existing housing supply, and it reviews the claimed benefits and potential criticisms of micro-units and ADUs. Finally, the Article evaluates whether demand for these units is a passing fad or signals a more substantial shift in housing and planning patterns.

New Article: “Brackets: A Historical Perspective”

1040New Article: Tracey M. Roberts, Brackets: A Historical Perspective, 108 Nw. L. Rev. 925 (2014).  Abstract below:

This Article surveys the history of the U.S. income tax system from 1913 to the present, examining changes in the structure of the graduated rates system over the past 100 years, using inflation-adjusted dollars. By connecting these changes to key events in the history of the  United States, the Article contextualizes modifications Congress has made to the income tax over time as well as the current debate surrounding several proposals for reform. First, the Article demonstrates that the rate structure has become more flat (with lower rates and fewer brackets than in the past), compressed (with less graduation, steeper jumps between brackets, and less penetration of the rate schedule into the income strata), and complex (with the proliferation of tax expenditures) over time. Second, the Article reveals that the structures that would result from two of the tax reform proposals being discussed in the popular media resemble historical rates and brackets. Because these proposals for tax reform have analogs in earlier versions of the income tax, the Article argues that analysis of economic data from prior periods may help inform tax policy and identifies an agenda for future research.

New Article: “Deregulating Public Interest Law”

New Article: Tom Lininger, Deregulating Public Interest Law, 88 Tulane L. Rev. 727 (2014).  [NOTE: UNFORTUNATELY Tulane Law Review does not seem to offer the article as a PDF from its own website, instead it directs you to paid services].  Abstract below:

The shortfall of legal services for indigent clients is alarming. The present rules seem unlikely to incentivize or require lawyers to address adequately the unmet legal needs of the poor. Several commentators have suggested the possibility that increased regulation could improve access to legal services. Very little scholarship, however, has considered whether the opposite proposition might be true: Could deregulation actually improve the availability of legal services for the poor?

This Article will consider four fairly radical proposals: (1) liberalizing the restrictions on foreign attorneys in order to allow outsourcing of legal aid services to India and Mexico, (2) permitting the practice of public interest law by laypeople in related fields such as family counseling and social work, (3) suspending the application of certain ethical rules to individuals and firms that exceed a minimum number of pro bono hours, and (4) reining in the American Bar Association’s accreditation requirements in order to allow the creation of “public interest academies” that would provide a low-cost alternative for law students who aspire to practice public interest law.

Close scrutiny reveals that the first three of these proposals are not viable. But the fourth proposal could transform American legal education and greatly advance the goal of equal access to justice. This Article concludes by noting some potential objections to the proposal for public interest academies and by identifying areas for future research.

New Article: “Riding the Wave: Uplifting Labor Organizations Through Immigration Reform”

New Article: Jayesh Rathod, Riding the Wave: Uplifting Labor Organizations Through Immigration Reform, 4 UC Irvine L. Rev. 625 (2014).  Abstract below:

In recent years, labor unions in the United States have embraced the immigrants’ rights movement, cognizant that the very future of organized labor depends on its ability to attract immigrant workers and integrate them into union ranks. At the same time, the immigrants’ rights movement has been lauded for its successful organizing models, often drawing upon the vitality and ingenuity of immigrant-based worker centers, which themselves have emerged as alternatives to traditional labor unions. And while the labor and immigrants’ rights movements have engaged in some fruitful collaborations, their mutual support has failed to radically reshape the trajectory of either cause.

In this Article, I argue that the ongoing legislative debates around immigration reform provide a unique opportunity to reimagine and revitalize traditional organized labor and to strengthen newer, immigrant-centered worker organizations. In my view, this can be accomplished by positioning unions and worker organizations as key actors in immigration processes (for both temporary and permanent immigration) and in any likely legalization initiative. Their specific roles might include sponsoring or indirectly supporting certain visa applications, facilitating the portability of employment-related visas from one employer to another, offering training opportunities to meet immigration requirements, assisting with legalization applications, leading immigrant integration initiatives, and more.

Apart from the instrumental objective of attracting immigrants to the ranks of unions and worker organizations, this set of proposals will position these institutions as sites where the virtues of leadership, democratic participation, and civic engagement can be forged in new Americans. Indeed, these virtues coincide with the founding values of most U.S. labor unions; to the extent some unions have strayed from these values, the proposals provide an external imperative to reorient and rebrand unions as core civil society institutions. Moreover, immigrant worker centers have already become known for their focus on leadership development, democratic decision making, and civic education, and are therefore uniquely positioned to play this role. This convergence of utilitarian and transcendent objectives, in the current sociopolitical moment, justifies a special position for unions and worker organizations in the U.S. immigration system.

Op-ed about the Bailout of Note: “Finally, the Truth About the A.I.G. Bailout”

Op-ed about the Bailout of Note: Noam Scheiber, Finally, the Truth About the A.I.G. Bailout, N.Y. Times, Sept. 28, 2014.

News Article: “As LA considers raising minimum wage, workers wonder how much it would help”

Chris Kirkham and Tiffany Hsu, As LA considers raising minimum wage, workers wonder how much it would help, L.A. Times, Oct. 14, 2014.

Wonkblog Post: Poor kids who do everything right don’t do better than rich kids who do everything wrong – The Washington Post

Here: Poor kids who do everything right don’t do better than rich kids who do everything wrong – The Washington Post.

Call-for-Papers: “Policing, Protesting, and Perceptions: A Critical Examination of the Events in Ferguson”

From the Legalscholarshipblog.com:

The University of Missouri Law Review is issuing a call for proposals for an upcoming Works-in-Progress conference, which will be held on Thursday, February 26, 2015, in conjunction with the Missouri Law Review’s Symposium, which will take place the following day Friday, February 27, 2015.

The symposium, “Policing, Protesting, and Perceptions: A Critical Examination of the Events in Ferguson,” focuses on a number of issues that arose from the events in Ferguson, Missouri this past August following the shooting of Michael Brown.

Works-in-progress panels will be held related to the subject matter of the symposium. Presentation proposals should be no more than one page in length. The topic of the presentation can include analyses that are practical, theoretical or interdisciplinary in nature relating to what transpired in Ferguson, MO.  Proposals from scholars outside the United States are also welcome, although prospective attendees should note that there is no funding available to assist participants with their travel expenses.

Proposal Deadline: November 15, 2014.  Those interested may submit proposals and direct questions to Professor S. David Mitchell (MitchellSD[@]missouri.edu).  Decisions regarding accepted proposals will be made by December 1, 2014.

Roundtable: “Re-evaluating the “Culture of Poverty””

Here: Re-evaluating the “Culture of Poverty” » The Society Pages [featuring Mark Gold, Kaaryn Gustafson, and Mario Luis Small].

New Book: “The Long Shadow: Family Background, Disadvantaged Urban Youth, and the Transition to Adulthood”

FinalLongShadow-AlexanderNew Book: Karl Alexander et al., The Long Shadow: Family Background, Disadvantaged Urban Youth, and the Transition to Adulthood (2014).  Overview below:

West Baltimore stands out in the popular imagination as the quintessential “inner city”—gritty, run-down, and marred by drugs and gang violence. Indeed, with the collapse of manufacturing jobs in the 1970s, the area experienced a rapid onset of poverty and high unemployment, with few public resources available to alleviate economic distress. But in stark contrast to the image of a perpetual “urban underclass” depicted in television by shows like The Wire, sociologists Karl Alexander, Doris Entwisle, and Linda Olson present a more nuanced portrait of Baltimore’s inner city residents that employs important new research on the significance of early-life opportunities available to low-income populations. The Long Shadow focuses on children who grew up in west Baltimore neighborhoods and others like them throughout the city, tracing how their early lives in the inner city have affected their long-term well-being. Although research for this book was conducted in Baltimore, that city’s struggles with deindustrialization, white flight, and concentrated poverty were characteristic of most East Coast and Midwest manufacturing cities. The experience of Baltimore’s children who came of age during this era is mirrored in the experiences of urban children across the nation.

For 25 years, the authors of The Long Shadow tracked the life progress of a group of almost 800 predominantly low-income Baltimore school children through the Beginning School Study Youth Panel (BSSYP). The study monitored the children’s transitions to young adulthood with special attention to how opportunities available to them as early as first grade shaped their socioeconomic status as adults. The authors’ fine-grained analysis confirms that the children who lived in more cohesive neighborhoods, had stronger families, and attended better schools tended to maintain a higher economic status later in life. As young adults, they held higher-income jobs and had achieved more personal milestones (such as marriage) than their lower-status counterparts. Differences in race and gender further stratified life opportunities for the Baltimore children. As one of the first studies to closely examine the outcomes of inner-city whites in addition to African Americans, data from the BSSYP shows that by adulthood, white men of lower status family background, despite attaining less education on average, were more likely to be employed than any other group in part due to family connections and long-standing racial biases in Baltimore’s industrial economy. Gender imbalances were also evident: the women, who were more likely to be working in low-wage service and clerical jobs, earned less than men. African American women were doubly disadvantaged insofar as they were less likely to be in a stable relationship than white women, and therefore less likely to benefit from a second income.

Combining original interviews with Baltimore families, teachers, and other community members with the empirical data gathered from the authors’ groundbreaking research, The Long Shadow unravels the complex connections between socioeconomic origins and socioeconomic destinations to reveal a startling and much-needed examination of who succeeds and why.