New Census Poverty and Health Coverage Statistics / Reports

This year what was a single report is broken into two reports:

CensusCarmen DeNavas-Walt and Bernadette D. Proctor, Income and Poverty in the United States: 2013 (Census Bureau 2014).

Jessica C. Smith and Carla Medalia, Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2013 (Census Bureau 2014).

New Article: “Tracing the School-to-Prison Pipeline from Zero-Tolerance Policies to Juvenile Justice Dispositions”

New Article: Aaron J. Curtis, Tracing the School-to-Prison Pipeline from Zero-Tolerance Policies to Juvenile Justice Dispositions, 102 Geo. L.J. 1251 (2014).  Abstract below:

In recent years, schools have attempted to combat school violence and other behavioral problems by instituting harsh disciplinary policies and referring students to law enforcement. Civil rights advocates argue that these practices push students, especially students of color, “out of school and into the juvenile and criminal justice systems.” The process has come to be known as the school-to-prison pipeline.

Throughout the literature discussing this phenomenon, authors often reference juvenile justice systems in passing, but few studies have given in-depth attention to the specific practices within juvenile courts that perpetuate the school-to-prison pipeline. Accordingly, this Note takes a closer look at the connection between harsh disciplinary practices in schools and the dispositional processes that occur in juvenile justice systems. Part I examines zero-tolerance policies that push students out of schools in the first place. Part II explores the ways that students then enter juvenile courts. Part III discusses the guidelines and other factors that shape judges’ dispositional decisions, particularly when they handle minor crimes and violations of zero-tolerance policies. Finally, Part IV describes alternatives to punitive sanctions for juvenile offenders. Overall, this Note concludes that zero-tolerance policies and punitive juvenile justice dispositions fail to remedy the problems that they are meant to resolve.

Cute Article: Family Reliant On Government Hand-outs To Have Second Child

Family Reliant On Government Hand-outs To Have Second Child – The Shovel.

Wages for Housework – Room for Debate – NYTimes.com

Wages for Housework – Room for Debate – NYTimes.com [featuring, among others, Noah Zatz].

Op-Ed: “Fairtrade is an unjust movement that serves the rich”

Fairtrade is an unjust movement that serves the rich | Ndongo Samba Sylla | Global development | theguardian.com.

New Report: “Accessing Justice in the Contemporary USA: Findings from the Community Needs and Services Study”

New Report: Rebecca L. Sandefur, Accessing Justice in the Contemporary USA: Findings from the Community Needs and Services Study (American Bar Foundation 2014).  Abstract from SSRN below:

A new study of the civil justice experiences of the American public, the Community Needs and Services Study, finds widespread incidence of events and situations that have civil legal aspects, raise civil legal issues and are potentially actionable under civil law. Most are handled outside the context of the formal justice system. These events are common and can be severe in their impacts. People experiencing these situations typically do not receive assistance from lawyers or other formal third parties.

In 2013, two-thirds (66%) of a random sample of adults in a middle-sized American city reported experiencing at least one of 12 different categories of civil justice situations in the previous 18 months. For the whole sample, the average number of situations was 2.1; for people who reported situations, the average number reported was 3.3. The most commonly reported kinds of situations involved bread and butter issues with far-reaching impacts: problems with employment, money (finances, government benefits, debts), insurance, and housing. Poor people were more likely to report civil justice situations than were middle-income or high-income people. African Americans and Hispanics were more likely to report such situations than Whites.

People reported that almost half (47%) of the civil justice situations they experienced resulted in a significant negative consequence such as feelings of fear, a loss of income or confidence, damage to physical or mental health, or verbal or physical violence or threats of violence. Adverse impacts on health were the most common negative consequence, reported for 27% of situations.

Typically, people handled these situations on their own. For only about a fifth (22%) of situations did they seek assistance from a third party outside their immediate social network, such as a lawyer, social worker, police officer, city agency, religious leader or elected official. When people who did not seek any assistance from third parties outside their social circles were asked if cost was one barrier to doing so, they reported that concerns about cost were a factor in 17% of cases. A more important reason that people do not seek assistance with these situations, in particular assistance from lawyers or courts, is that they do not understand these situations to be legal.

 

Equal Justice Works Job Fair Deadline Fast Approaching

Equal Justice Works Job Fair Deadline Fast Approaching: Information for Law Students and Graduates | Equal Justice Works.

A Church for the Poor – NYTimes.com

A Church for the Poor – NYTimes.com.

Bad luck meets bad policy: Why it can be so hard to get the unemployed back to work – The Washington Post

Bad luck meets bad policy: Why it can be so hard to get the unemployed back to work – The Washington Post.

How municipalities in St. Louis County, Mo., profit from poverty – The Washington Post

How municipalities in St. Louis County, Mo., profit from poverty – The Washington Post.