Call for Papers: “Conference on Advancing Equal Access to Justice:  Barriers, Dilemmas, and Prospects”

Call for Papers: Conference on Advancing Equal Access to Justice:  Barriers, Dilemmas, and Prospects, University of California Hastings College of the Law and Stanford Center on the Legal Profession, Stanford Law School, November 12-13, 2015, San Francisco, California.  Deadline for submissions: Nov. 12, 2014.

Full details after the break.

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Revised Call-for-Papers Deadline: “The New Color Lines: What Will It Mean to Be an American?”

Revised Call-for-Papers: The West Virginia Law Review shall publish papers that explore the legal implications of the projected end of a nationwide white ethnic majority in the United States by 2043. Authors whose papers are accepted for publication will also be expected to present their projects at the 19th Mid-Atlantic People of Color Conference (MAPOC) from January 29-31, 2015, in Morgantown, West Virginia.  More information here: W Va L Rev Call for Papers v 3 FINAL.

There is also a student writing competition: MAPOC is sponsoring a writing competition open to all currently enrolled law students of any level, J.D., LL.M., and S.J.D., at a U.S. law school. Papers should be between 15,000-25,000 words in length and there is a preference for papers related to the conference theme but we will accept papers on other topics as well. Please email submissions (and any questions) to erosser@wcl.american.edu no later than Oct. 15, 2014. The  winning submission will receive $300 and travel expenses to attend the Conference. The two runner-ups will receive $100 each.

Symposium Issues published (in 2013): “Saving the Cities: How to Make America’s Urban Core Sustainable in the Twenty-First Century”

Symposium Issues published (in 2013): St. Louis U. Pub. L. Rev. published a symposium issue on “Saving the Cities: How to Make America’s Urban Core Sustainable in the Twenty-First Century” (if you click on the above link, it will take you to a TOC where the articles can be accessed) with some great sounding articles:

CITIZEN ENGAGEMENT IN THE
SHRINKING CITY: TOWARD
DEVELOPMENT JUSTICE IN AN
ERA OF GROWING INEQUALITY …………………………Barbara L. Bezdek 3
THE PROMISES AND PITFALLS
OF TIF IN THE ST. LOUIS
METROPOLITAN REGION: A
LOOK AT NEIGHBORHOOD
DISPARITIES ………………………………………………………..Sarah L. Coffin 57
ST. LOUIS BLUES: THE URBAN
CRISIS IN THE GATEWAY CITY………………………………….Colin Gordon 81
URBAN LAND BANKS AND THE
HOUSING FORECLOSURE AND
ABANDONMENT CRISIS……………………………………W. Dennis Keating 93
A CONTINUUM IN REMEDIES:
RECONNECTING VACANT
HOUSES TO THE MARKET…………………………………. James J. Kelly, Jr. 109

CITIZEN ENGAGEMENT IN THE
SHRINKING CITY: TOWARD
DEVELOPMENT JUSTICE IN AN
ERA OF GROWING INEQUALITY …………………………Barbara L. Bezdek 3
THE PROMISES AND PITFALLS
OF TIF IN THE ST. LOUIS
METROPOLITAN REGION: A
LOOK AT NEIGHBORHOOD
DISPARITIES ………………………………………………………..Sarah L. Coffin 57
ST. LOUIS BLUES: THE URBAN
CRISIS IN THE GATEWAY CITY………………………………….Colin Gordon 81
URBAN LAND BANKS AND THE
HOUSING FORECLOSURE AND
ABANDONMENT CRISIS……………………………………W. Dennis Keating 93
A CONTINUUM IN REMEDIES:
RECONNECTING VACANT
HOUSES TO THE MARKET…………………………………. James J. Kelly, Jr. 109

-many might make good sources and/or assignments related to Ferguson as well.

Holder Backs Suit in New York Faulting Legal Service for Poor – NYTimes.com

Holder Backs Suit in New York Faulting Legal Service for Poor – NYTimes.com.

Conference Agenda and Registration: “The New Prosperity Law: Expanding Opportunity and Reducing Inequality” – Berkeley, Oct. 16-17, 2014

Berkeley FlyerConference Agenda and Registration: “The New Prosperity Law: Expanding Opportunity and Reducing Inequality,” Boalt Hall, UC Berkeley School of Law, Oct. 16-17, 2014.  The conference has great speakers (the link above has the schedule and bios) and the overview is below:

This ​year ​marks ​the ​50th ​anniversary ​of ​the ​War ​on ​Poverty, ​ which ​is ​an ​important ​time ​to ​reflect ​on ​the ​role ​that ​law ​ schools ​and ​lawyers ​have ​played, ​and ​can ​continue ​to ​play, ​in  ​efforts ​to ​reduce ​inequality ​and ​expand ​opportunity. ​In ​the ​War ​on ​Poverty, ​law ​schools ​and ​lawyers ​were ​central ​actors ​in ​a  coordinated ​strategy ​to ​end ​poverty ​by ​establishing ​ constitutional ​protections ​and ​substantive ​rights ​for ​the ​poor. ​ Within ​a ​decade ​of ​its ​inception, ​however, ​the ​substantive ​ antipoverty ​movement ​gave ​way ​to ​a ​procedural ​access ​to ​ justice ​agenda. ​Political ​battles ​over ​resources ​for ​legal ​services ​were ​at ​the ​heart ​of ​this ​shift, ​reflecting ​larger ​trends ​of ​decentralization ​(from ​federal ​to ​state) ​and ​privatization ​(from ​the ​government ​to ​the ​market). ​As ​a ​result, ​legal ​antipoverty ​efforts ​today ​are ​much ​more ​local, ​varied ​and ​diffuse ​than ​during ​the ​War ​on ​Poverty. ​

This ​symposium ​will ​examine ​lessons ​from ​the ​last ​fifty ​years, ​ consider ​emerging ​anti-poverty ​efforts, ​explore ​shifts ​in ​the ​ funding ​landscape ​and ​identify ​strategies ​to ​reinvigorate ​the ​ role ​of ​law ​schools ​and ​lawyers ​in ​a ​new ​antipoverty ​agenda.

New Article: “Out in the Cold: The Failure of Tenant Enforcement of the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit”

New Article: Desiree Carole Hensley, Out in the Cold: The Failure of Tenant Enforcement of the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit, forthcoming Cinn. L. Rev.  Abstract below:

This Article seeks to start a conversation about the rights of the people who reside in Low-Income Housing Tax Credit units and how the law can be changed to better protect them; about their right not only to long-term housing at affordable rents, but to housing that is suitable for occupancy according to local or federal standards; about how they may enforce those rights; and about what policy makers can do to strengthen that enforcement.

New Book: “We Want What’s Ours: Learning from South Africa’s Land Restitution Program”

WeWantNew Book: Bernadette Atuahene, We Want What’s Ours: Learning from South Africa’s Land Restitution Program (2014).  Overview below:

Millions of people all over the world have been displaced from their homes and property. Dispossessed individuals and communities often lose more than the physical structures they live in and their material belongings, they are also denied their dignity. These are dignity takings, and land dispossessions occurring in South Africa during colonialism and apartheid are quintessential examples. There have been numerous examples of dignity takings throughout the world, but South Africa stands apart because of its unique remedial efforts. The nation has attempted to move beyond the more common step of providing reparations (compensation for physical losses) to instead facilitating dignity restoration, which is a comprehensive remedy that seeks to restore property while also confronting the underlying dehumanization, infantilization, and political exclusion that enabled the injustice. Dignity restoration is the fusion of reparations with restorative justice. In We Want Whats Ours, Bernadette Atuahenes detailed research and interviews with over one hundred and fifty South Africans who participated in the nations land restitution program provide a snapshot of South Africas successes and failures in achieving dignity restoration.

We Want What’s Ours is globally relevant because dignity takings have happened all around the world and throughout history: the Nazi confiscation of property from Jews during World War II; the Hutu taking of property from Tutsis during the Rwandan genocide; the widespread commandeering of native peoples property across the globe; and Saddam Husseins seizing of property from the Kurds and others in Iraq are but a few examples. When people are deprived of their property and dignity in years to come, the lessons learned in South Africa can help governments, policy makers, scholars, and international institutions make the transition from reparations to the more robust project of dignity restoration.

Op-Ed: Beyond Marriage – NYTimes.com

Beyond Marriage – NYTimes.com.

Op-Ed: Why Poor Students Struggle – NYTimes.com

Why Poor Students Struggle – NYTimes.com.

New Census Poverty and Health Coverage Statistics / Reports

This year what was a single report is broken into two reports:

CensusCarmen DeNavas-Walt and Bernadette D. Proctor, Income and Poverty in the United States: 2013 (Census Bureau 2014).

Jessica C. Smith and Carla Medalia, Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2013 (Census Bureau 2014).